Perkins Administration

Mission

To lead and support the preparation of all Nebraskans for learning, earning, and living.

Vision

Nebraska Career and Technical Education (CTE) will deliver coordinated, relevant learning opportunities that engage each student in high-quality, rigorous education. These opportunities will be enhanced by partnerships with business and industry, workforce, and economic development leaders, allowing learners to turn their passion, talents, and strengths into successful careers and fulfilling lives.

2020-2021 Perkins V Important Dates & Deadlines

March 1, 2020
Intent to Participate in Perkins V forms are due to NDE
July 1, 2020
Grant Award Notification (GAN) for 1/4 of annual allocation available (after Local Perkins Application approved by NDE)
June 15, 2020
All Perkins Accountability Data due to NDE
August 1, 2020
Amendment submissions for 2019-20 grant due
(2019-2020 funds cannot be carried over into the 2020-2021 grant year.)
June 25, 2020
Local Perkins Application submission due to NDE
October 1, 2020
Final Claims for Reimbursement for 2019-20 due to NDE

Local Perkins Application (2020-2024)

This is the template for the Local Perkins Application under Perkins V. Once complete, this application will then be uploaded into the NDE’s Grants Management System where the remaining application components and requirements will be completed.

Click one of the following links to download an editable version of the Local Perkins Application covering program years 2020-2024:

Perkins Budget Template

This template is provided to help gather and prepare the necessary information to enable quick and easy entry into the GMS Perkins Budget.

Click here to download a copy of the Perkins Budget Template. 

Perkins Management Guide

PERKINS MANAGEMENT GUIDE

6 Required Local Uses of Funds

1. Funds shall be used to support CTE programs of sufficient size, scope and quality

2. Funds shall be used to provide professional development for teachers, faculty, school leaders, administrators, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors

3. Funds shall be used to provide within CTE the skills necessary to pursue careers in high-skill, high-wage, high demand occupations

4. Funds shall be used to support integration of academic skills into CTE programs and programs of study

5. Funds shall be used to plan and carry out element that support the implementation of CTE programs and programs of study and that result in increasing student achievement of the local levels of performance established

6. Funds shall be used to develop and implement evaluations of the activities carried out with funds including evaluations necessary to complete the comprehensive needs assessment required

Areas of Emphasis

Perkins V requires Nebraska and local recipients to put emphasis in areas designed to result in program improvement and increased student achievement. These areas include:

  • Driving program improvement through programs of study
  • Requiring data-driven decision making on local spending through the new comprehensive local needs assessment (reVISION), involving significant stakeholder consultation and a focus on disaggregated data.
  • Using the increased statewide Perkins reserve fund to spur local innovation and implementation of programs of study
  • Supporting career exploration in the middle grades (grades 5-8)
  • Enhancing program quality, including a new program quality performance indicator
  • Increasing the focus on serving special populations, including an expanded definition and required uses of statewide Perkins leadership funds

Career Development

Career Development is a process by which individuals get to know their strengths and interests; learn how different jobs connect to those interests and skills; explore careers in current labor markets; and build career planning and management skills to achieve career goals.

The Nebraska Career Development model represents a career development process with three components; self-awareness, career exploration and career planning and management. All three components are included at each level for K-12 program planning. It is essential for students to learn through this experiential process to be well informed and prepared to make career decisions with the best fit to themselves and their goals. The Nebraska Career Development Model consists of three skill domains with component parts:

Self-Awareness: Self-awareness skills refer to individuals gaining the ability to identify their interests, skills, and work values. Self-awareness includes understanding one’s own mastery level of career readiness (employability) skills. The Nebraska Career Readiness Skills are essential for all types of careers. This enhanced self-awareness paves the way to effectively explore careers and identify personal career goals with the best fit.

  • Nebraska Career Readiness Skills
  • Career and Academic Assessment.

Career Exploration: Career exploration skills consists of learning how to identify and analyze various career options in terms of what education, training, experience, and competencies are required for success. Exploration includes learning in workplace environments or directly in workplaces to discover and experience what it may be like to work in different occupations. It also involves learning how to evaluate how well a career matches or fits one’s own interests, skills, strengths, and work values.

  • Nebraska Career Education Model, CTE Programs of Study, and Career & Technical Student Organizations
  • Labor Market Information
  • Workplace Learning Experiences

Career Planning & Management: Nearly all career require education and training beyond high school. It is important to consider all possible options available for postsecondary education. Entrance into some careers may best begin with apprenticeships, on-the-job training, stackable credentials or certifications, entrepreneurship training, or entry-level employment. In some careers entrance options require postsecondary degree completion before starting employment. Investigating the best option, understanding how to access it and plan for it is the focus in this part of career development. Regardless of option selected, knowledge of entrance requirements, application processes, financial aid, completion timelines, locations, living arrangements and personal budget are some of the vital details students and families need to consider. Career planning and management is about moving from decision making to setting career goals with an action plan. In Nebraska, the plan for academics, career technical education, activities and workplace learning is a Personal Learning Plan (PLP). The PLP along with other artifacts and work samples are to be saved in a portfolio to display Nebraska Career Readiness Standards.

  • College and Career Options
  • Personal Learning Plans & Portfolio

Essential Components

What is size, scope and quality?  Framed around Nebraska CTE’s four guiding principles (equitable, relevant, connected, innovative), the following Essential Components represent the minimum criteria necessary for a sufficient system/program size, scope, and quality to meet the needs of all students served. Collectively, they ensure funds are used to drive high-quality, equitable and impactful CTE programs.

Size refers to the quantifiable evidence, physical parameters, and limitations of each approved program that relates to the ability of the program to address all student learning outcomes. Generally, size will be defined by item such as the required number of programs and availability of facilities and equipment to ensure quality, equity, and access.

Scope provides curricular expectations of each program and/or program of study to cover the full breadth of its subject. Generally, scope involves appropriate sequencing of courses, career development, early postsecondary and work-based learning opportunities, the role of the advisory committees, and the role of Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs).

Quality refers to the strength of the overall system components, including the extent to which these components positively impact student outcomes.

EQUITABLE

Size

Each student, including those from special populations, is provided with equitable access to CTE programs and activities including CTSOs

  • Alternative education programs include CTE
  • Emphasis is given to the recruitment and retention of students into programs nontraditional for their gender

Scope

  • CTE students are provided with an ongoing, organized, systemic framework for career development from middle grades through postsecondary;

Career guidance and development information and support are available to all students

At the secondary level:

  • All secondary students develop and maintain a personal learning plan
  • A career information system (such as Nebraska Career Connections) is available for all student and parent use
  • Secondary programs utilize the Nebraska School Counseling Model and the Nebraska Career Education Model (https://www.education.ne.gov/nce/careerdevelopment/)

Quality

  • Recipients meet or exceed performance targets established for state and federal Perkins accountability indicators
  • Accountability and enrollment data, per Section 113, are available and submitted annually
  • Resources are directed towards addressing disparities in performance across subpopulations of students
  • Accessibility and/or accommodations are provided to each student, including those who are members of a special population

 

RELEVANT

Size:

Local CTE systems include programming inclusive of opportunities that represent the broad range of available Nebraska CTE career fields/program areas, including:

  • Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources
  • Business, Marketing, and Management
  • Communication & Information Systems
  • Health Sciences
  • Human Sciences and Education, and
  • Skilled and Technical Sciences

At the secondary level:

  • No less than one state-model program of study shall be offered, and
  • No less than one state-authorized Career & Technical Student Organization (CTSO) aligned with the CTE courses and content offered in the school(s) is available for student participation.

At the postsecondary level:

  • No less than one program in each of Nebraska’s career field areas that maintains an occupational focus and prepares students for entry level employment, advanced skill development, and/or advanced training, as identified through the revision process will be offered and
  • No less than one state-authorized CTSO at the primary campus level.

 

Scope:

  • CTE programs are aligned to the Nebraska Career Education Model

A comprehensive understanding of and strong experience in all aspects of an industry are provided to students, including:

  • occupations and careers that represent the full scope of an industry;
  • technology, workforce and community issues, and health, safety, and environmental issues related to the industry
  • Emphasis is placed on developing essential workplace skills through integration of Nebraska’s Career Readiness Standards throughout the local education system or institution
  • CTE programs are aligned with local/regional workforce and economic development efforts
  • Appropriate assessments, both formative and summative, are utilized to measure and encourage student achievement;
  • CTE programs include opportunities for dual-credit and/or credentialing;

At the secondary level:

  • Secondary CTE course instruction addresses at least 90% of the state-approved standards

Quality:

  • CTE programs of study and courses are delivered by instructors who meet Nebraska’s requirements to teach at the secondary and/or postsecondary level(s)
    • Professional development is provided to school counselors, teachers/instructors, paraeducators, and administrators to enhance student learning
    • Professional development includes both technical and pedagogical knowledge and skill development opportunities
    • Contextual learning opportunities are embedded across all content/program areas
    • High quality, standards-aligned instructional materials are accessible to every student
    • Industry-grade equipment and technology encourage student attainment of relevant, rigorous technical skills;
    • Facilities, equipment, and resources are of sufficient size and quality to accommodate participating students and keep them safe

COORDINATED

Size:

  • Local CTE program offerings are informed by labor market information (LMI) to identify alignment to regional and statewide employment projections
  • Essential partnerships that link CTE in schools and colleges with business and industry, workforce, economic development, and government agencies

 

Scope:

  • Alignment between secondary and postsecondary CTE programs with evidence of joint planning. This may include but is not limited to articulation agreements, dual-credit opportunities, opportunities for the attainment of industry recognized credentials, and aligned CTE curriculum
  • CTSOs are aligned with CTE curriculum

Quality:

  • Career pathways offer multiple entry and exit points for students
  • Partnerships are developed to enhance CTE
    • CTE programs and programs of study offerings are systematically reviewed by the local or regional advisory council for alignment and quality
    • Secondary and postsecondary partnerships assist in student transitions
    • Parents, students, and stakeholders are consulted, as appropriate, for input and evaluation of CTE program

INNOVATIVE

Size:

  • Local CTE systems should provide opportunities for students to participate in coursework through a wide array of delivery models, including classroom, lab, workplace, and other applied experiences

Scope:

  • Promotion of expanded learning and leadership opportunities for students through components such as workplace experiences and CTSOs
  • Opportunities for students to participate in distance and/or blended CTE programs and courses

Quality:

  • Offering meaningful workplace learning opportunities to all students, including those from special populations that align with their CTE programs of study

Glossary of Terms

Administration:  Activities of a local authorized agency necessary for the proper and efficient performance of its duties under this application.

All aspects of the industry:  Strong experience in and an understanding of all aspects of the industry the students are preparing to enter, including planning, management, finances, technical and production skills, underlying principles of technology, labor issues and health and safety issues.

Articulation Agreements:  An agreement with secondary and postsecondary institutions that prevents duplication within sequences of courses.

Assessment:  A comprehensive, ongoing process with the purpose of identifying characteristics, strengths, weaknesses and interests as well as education, training, support services and placement needs.

Career Education:  Educational programs offering a sequence of courses that are directly related to the preparation of individuals in paid or unpaid employment in current or emerging occupations requiring other than a baccalaureate or advanced degree.  Such programs shall include competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills and occupational specific skills necessary for economic independence as a productive and contributing member of society.

Career & Technical Student Organization:  An organization for individuals enrolled in a career and technical education program that engages in career and technical activities as an integral part of the instructional program. In Nebraska the organizations include: DECA, an Association of Marketing Students; FCCLA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America; FBLA, Future Business Leaders of America; HOSA, Health Occupations Students of America; Nebraska FFA Association; and SkillsUSA.

Career academies:  Programs that focus on a career theme in a field in which demand is growing and good employment opportunities exist.  The curriculum combines technical and academic content with part-time employment in jobs related to the career theme.

Career guidance and counseling:  Programs providing access to information regarding career awareness and planning with respect to an individual’s occupational and academic future that shall involve guidance and counseling with respect to career options, financial aid and postsecondary options.

Cooperative education:  A method of instruction for individuals who, through written cooperative arrangements between the school and employers, receive instruction, including required academic courses and related career education instruction by alternation of study in school with a job in any occupational field.  Such alternation shall be planned and supervised by the school and employers so that each contributes to the student’s education and to his or her employability. Work periods and school attendance may be on alternate half days, full days, weeks or other periods of time in fulfilling the cooperative program.

Guiding Assumptions

Perkins V maintains much of the program improvement emphasis of Perkins IV, but requires Nebraska CTE to focus on additional areas as well. The following guiding assumptions are instrumental in moving Perkins forward:

Federal Perkins V funding for Nebraska CTE is not an entitlement at either the state or local level

The use of Perkins V funds must be focused on school improvement and increased student achievement outcomes

CTE and academic core content must be integrated in a comprehensive way connecting the core academics of CTE courses

Students must participate in systemic career development at all levels of education

The skills needed for success in postsecondary education and careers are one in the same

CTE must be strategically positioned within the broader vision, mission, and goals for education within the state of Nebraska.

Guiding Principles

These principles are recognized to provide focus to the work of Nebraska CTE and intended to result in outcomes aligned to the mission and vision. They are foundational to all efforts:

Equitable

Nebraska CTE champions all schools, colleges, and communities in developing and maintaining a culture that supports learning opportunities for all students, across all backgrounds and circumstances so that they receive meaningful access to and opportunities for success in high-quality CTE programs and personalized career development. Education equity allows learners to discover and explore their passions and make meaningful connections within the context of their postsecondary interests.

Relevant

Nebraska’s CTE system is driven by economic and workforce demands and created in partnerships with the community and engaged stakeholders. All learning is facilitated by knowledgeable experts.

Innovative

Nebraska CTE will be bold in its approach to creating new solutions for addressing educational and workforce challenges. Co-curricular and expanded learning experiences (e.g. work-based learning, entrepreneurship education, and career and technical student organizations) allow learners to apply, demonstrate, and refine their connected academic, technical, and career readiness skills.

Coordinated

Nebraska CTE works alongside state and local agency, education, and community partners to be proactive, responsive, and adaptive to state and local workforce needs and increase the visibility and coherence of services provided.

Size, Scope and Quality

What is size, scope and quality?  Framed around Nebraska CTE’s four guiding principles (equitable, relevant, connected, innovative), the following Essential Components represent the minimum criteria necessary for a sufficient system/program size, scope, and quality to meet the needs of all students served. Collectively, they ensure funds are used to drive high-quality, equitable and impactful CTE programs.

Size refers to the quantifiable evidence, physical parameters, and limitations of each approved program that relates to the ability of the program to address all student learning outcomes. Generally, size will be defined by item such as the required number of programs and availability of facilities and equipment to ensure quality, equity, and access.

Scope provides curricular expectations of each program and/or program of study to cover the full breadth of its subject. Generally, scope involves appropriate sequencing of courses, career development, early postsecondary and work-based learning opportunities, the role of the advisory committees, and the role of Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs).

Quality refers to the strength of the overall system components, including the extent to which these components positively impact student outcomes.

EQUITABLE

Size

Each student, including those from special populations, is provided with equitable access to CTE programs and activities including CTSOs

  • Alternative education programs include CTE
  • Emphasis is given to the recruitment and retention of students into programs nontraditional for their gender

Scope

  • CTE students are provided with an ongoing, organized, systemic framework for career development from middle grades through postsecondary;
  • Career guidance and development information and support are available to all studentsSecondary:
  • All secondary students develop and maintain a personal learning plan
  • A career information system (such as Nebraska Career Connections) is available for all student and parent use
  • Secondary programs utilize the Nebraska School Counseling Model and the Nebraska Career Education Model (https://www.education.ne.gov/nce/careerdevelopment/)

Quality

  • Recipients meet or exceed performance targets established for state and federal Perkins accountability indicators
  • Accountability and enrollment data, per Section 113, are available and submitted annually
  • Resources are directed towards addressing disparities in performance across subpopulations of students
  • Accessibility and/or accommodations are provided to each student, including those who are members of a special population

RELEVANT

Size

Local CTE systems include programming inclusive of opportunities that represent the broad range of available Nebraska CTE career fields/program areas, including:

  • Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources
  • Business, Marketing, and Management
  • Communication & Information Systems
  • Health Sciences
  • Human Sciences and Education, and
  • Skilled and Technical Sciences

 

At the secondary level:

  • No less than one state-model program of study shall be offered, and
  • No less than one state-authorized Career & Technical Student Organization (CTSO) aligned with the CTE courses and content offered in the school(s) is available for student participation.

 

At the postsecondary level:

  • No less than one program in each of Nebraska’s career field areas that maintains an occupational focus and prepares students for entry level employment, advanced skill development, and/or advanced training, as identified through the revision process will be offered and
  • No less than one state-authorized CTSO at the primary campus level.

 

Scope

  • CTE programs are aligned to the Nebraska Career Education Model

A comprehensive understanding of and strong experience in all aspects of an industry are provided to students, including:

  • occupations and careers that represent the full scope of an industry;
  • technology, workforce and community issues, and health, safety, and environmental issues related to the industry
  • Emphasis is placed on developing essential workplace skills through integration of Nebraska’s Career Readiness Standards throughout the local education system or institution
  • CTE programs are aligned with local/regional workforce and economic development efforts
  • Appropriate assessments, both formative and summative, are utilized to measure and encourage student achievement;
  • CTE programs include opportunities for dual-credit and/or credentialing;

 

Secondary:

  • Secondary CTE course instruction addresses at least 90% of the state-approved standards

Quality:

  • CTE programs of study and courses are delivered by instructors who meet Nebraska’s requirements to teach at the secondary and/or postsecondary level(s)
    • Professional development is provided to school counselors, teachers/instructors, paraeducators, and administrators to enhance student learning
    • Professional development includes both technical and pedagogical knowledge and skill development opportunities
    • Contextual learning opportunities are embedded across all content/program areas
    • High quality, standards-aligned instructional materials are accessible to every student
    • Industry-grade equipment and technology encourage student attainment of relevant, rigorous technical skills;
    • Facilities, equipment, and resources are of sufficient size and quality to accommodate participating students and keep them safe

 

COORDINATED

Size

  • Local CTE program offerings are informed by labor market information (LMI) to identify alignment to regional and statewide employment projections
  • Essential partnerships that link CTE in schools and colleges with business and industry, workforce, economic development, and government agencies

Scope

  • Alignment between secondary and postsecondary CTE programs with evidence of joint planning. This may include but is not limited to articulation agreements, dual-credit opportunities, opportunities for the attainment of industry recognized credentials, and aligned CTE curriculum
  • CTSOs are aligned with CTE curriculum

Quality

  • Career pathways offer multiple entry and exit points for students
  • Partnerships are developed to enhance CTE
    • CTE programs and programs of study offerings are systematically reviewed by the local or regional advisory council for alignment and quality
    • Secondary and postsecondary partnerships assist in student transitions
    • Parents, students, and stakeholders are consulted, as appropriate, for input and evaluation of CTE program

INNOVATIVE

Size

  • Local CTE systems should provide opportunities for students to participate in coursework through a wide array of delivery models, including classroom, lab, workplace, and other applied experiences

Scope

  • Promotion of expanded learning and leadership opportunities for students through components such as workplace experiences and CTSOs
  • Opportunities for students to participate in distance and/or blended CTE programs and courses

Quality

  • Offering meaningful workplace learning opportunities to all students, including those from special populations that align with their CTE programs of study

Special Populations Definition

Representatives of special populations–
Including individuals with disabilities;
Individuals from economically disadvantaged families;
Including low-income youth and adults;
Individuals preparing for non-traditional fields;
Single parents, including single pregnant women;
Out-of-workforce individuals;
English learners;
Homeless individuals:  youth who are in, or have aged out of, the foster care system;
Youth with a parent who is a member of the armed forces (as such term is defined in section 101(a)(4) of title 10, United States Code); and  is on active duty (as such term is defined in section 101(d)(1) of such title.

Strategic Priorities

In response to the Perkins V areas of emphasis, Nebraska CTE has established the following eight strategic priorities to realize its vision. The goal of these priorities is to build onto and catapult Nebraska’s high-quality CTE system that responds to workforce needs, labor market information, and economic development priorities.

  • Aligned CTE Programs

The careers we prepare learners for are constantly emerging and changing. CTE programs allow learners the chance to explore career options, identify their interests, and develop the knowledge and skills that prepare them to transition to postsecondary education and into entry-level careers.  These programs must be well aligned to the next opportunities learners encounter and keep pace with the constant evolution found in the marketplace.

Alignment between Nebraska’s secondary and postsecondary CTE systems means that they are: (1) intentional and seamless with no duplication of content; (2) accessible to each student, including those with interests in dual credit and workplace experiences, and (3) incentivized for key economic and employer needs.

  • Systemic Career Development

Career development is the process by which individuals get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, explore careers in current labor markets, and build career planning and management skills to achieve their goals.1 There are multiple pathways to rewarding careers. There are three components to effective career development: self-awareness, career exploration, and career planning and management.

Career development programs equip learners with the skills needed to take ownership in navigating their own career pathways. Career development is positive student development. If students see the relevance and meaning in school, it results in improved interest and academic performance. Students become more motivated, self-directed learners when they understand the relationship between academics, education planning, and achieving their own career goals.

Career Development must be systemic—intentionally infused throughout all levels and areas of K-12 and postsecondary education. Every adult within an educational setting should own their role in students’ career development progress.

1 National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability

  • Student Achievement

Nebraska CTE provides an educational environment that integrates core academic and technical preparation for contextualized learning that increases engagement and supports improved academic, technical, and career readiness achievement for all students.

The Nebraska State Board of Education approves content area standards for all content areas including CTE, not just those which are tested for statewide accountability (i.e. reading, math, science).

Nebraska CTE drives rigorous content area standards implementation through programs of study.

  • Data Use

Nebraska CTE will assist educators in making a more formal shift from collecting data to using data to ensure local CTE programs create success for students and employers.

The quality and effectiveness of Nebraska CTE is dependent on the ability to constantly evaluate and improve. Through the newly implemented comprehensive local needs assessment (reVISION) process, all local recipients are required to analyze disaggregated student performance data to identify performance disparities across student groups, detect root causes, and direct resources towards addressing both.

  • Work-based Learning

Work-based learning strategies connect learners with employers to prepare them for success in an ever-changing workplace. Work-based learning is a planned program of meaningful experiences related to the career interests of a learner that enable him/her to acquire knowledge and skills in a real work setting. It requires strong partnerships between schools, colleges, and local employers.

Work-based learning is learning through work, not learning about work.

Nebraska will evaluate the quality of CTE programs, in part, by the percentage of CTE concentrators who participate in high-quality work-based learning experiences. An effective means to monitor, evaluate, and promote these experiences is foundational.

  • Sustained Professional Development

Effective Nebraska CTE programs require highly prepared instructors, administrators, staff, and support personnel who are supported by sustained, high-quality, and relevant professional development. Nebraska CTE professional development includes effective training at both the pre- and in-service levels and the pursuit of advanced credentials and degrees.

  • Instructor Recruitment and Retention

To deliver effective and relevant CTE programming, there must be an adequate supply of qualified instructors who are knowledgeable in their technical areas as well as in academic competencies and workplace requirements essential to their CTE program areas. Innovative and bold strategies must be employed to recruit and retain CTE teachers, especially in those areas with critical teacher shortages.

  • Middle School CTE

Middle grades (5th-8th) CTE adds relevance to students’ learning experiences by exposing them to real-world options and connecting academics to career and college options. IT equips students with transferrable skills needed as they transition to high school and beyond, and serves as a key dropout prevention strategy mitigating challenges such as disengagement and lack of preparation.

Nebraska Middle School CTE programming must be aligned to the overarching CTE system, encourage hands-on career exploration opportunities, and available to each student.2

OTHER QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Consortia - Frequently Asked Questions

Perkins Consortium FAQ

This FAQ is intended to help answer some commonly asked questions regarding funding to Perkins consortia. If this document does not answer a question that you have, please contact the Division of Career & Technical Education for more information.

  1. Why are there Perkins consortia?

The Perkins Act does not allow a local education agency (LEA) to receive an allocation unless the allocation is greater than $15,000 [Perkins Act §131 (c)]. An LEA with an allocation below the minimum of $15,000 must join a consortium in order to meet program requirements [§ 1 35] and access mutual benefits provided by the consortium partnership [§ 131 (f)].

  1. How are Perkins funds allocated to a consortium?

The Perkins Act establishes a formula that is used to calculate an allocation for an LEA based on district population (ages 5-17) and population of students who are economically disadvantaged (ages 5-17) [§ 1 31 (a)]. Districts that are members of a Perkins consortium transfer their districts allocations to the consortium in order to meet the minimum threshold to be eligible for Perkins funds [§ 131 (c)].

  1. Who determines how Perkins funds are allocated in a consortium?

The consortium membership must plan, set goals, and review the CTE needs of all the member districts within a consortium. Joint planning by all consortium members should result in the most effective use of funds for CTE and programs that are sufficient in size, scope, and quality to be effective. At a minimum, the use of consortium funds must be used only for purposes and programs that are mutually beneficial to all members of the consortium, reflect CTE program needs and improvements, and enhance teaching and learning outcomes.  [§ 131 (f)]

  1. How should funding decisions be determined?

The consortium should meet with all consortium members to discuss areas of needs and needed improvements across the districts in the consortium. Based on needs performance, the consortium members should create strategies and goals that will improve performance across the consortium. The consortium may support only approved CTE programs in the consortium. Funding decisions should be supported by the goals and strategies identified in the consortium’s Comprehensive Local Needs Assessment (reVISION) and result in program improvements. Funds must be used for mutual benefit of all consortium members. [§ 1 31 (f),§134, § 1 35]

  1. If consortium members agree, can the consortium grant back or reallocate funds back to member districts in the amount of the district’s Perkins allocation?

No, a consortium cannot reallocate funds back to members in the amounts of their original allocations or for purposes that are not mutually beneficial. The Perkins Act clearly prohibits this by a consortium [§13 l(f) (2)].

  1. Can a single CTE program area or career pathway be funded in a particular year?

Yes, this is allowable if the consortium members agree in a determination that a single cluster program or cluster pathway is the best use of Perkins funds for that year. [§ 1 31 (f)].

Example: If a consortium reviews the CTE needs assessment data of all the schools within the consortium and determines that the funds should be focused on programs in the Architecture & Construction cluster, then all Architecture & Construction programs in the consortium must have the opportunity to participate.  Funded expenditures could include sub pay for teachers while attending professional development, professional development costs, supplies and equipment for Architecture & Construction programs.

  1. If consortium members agree, can the same entity receive the majority of funds year after year?

No, one entity cannot dominate funds year after year [§ 131 (f) (2)].

  1. If the consortium members agree, can funds be allocated solely to professional development in a given year?

Yes, the funds could be used solely for professional development needs in a given year [§131 (f)]

  1. Can equipment be purchased and shared by consortium members?

Yes, programmatically all items purchased with Perkins funds belong to the consortium. The consortium is required to keep an inventory for all items purchased by the consortium. Please note that in accordance to state auditing requirements, all equipment must also be listed in the district member’s capital assets and identified as an asset of the consortium. When the school receives the equipment, the item must be added to the asset list and when the equipment moves to the next district the record would then need to indicate that the item was given to another district which then must list the item in their assets. This process must be continued in order to document the asset, but also as an internal control.

  1. What are some responsibilities of participating consortium members?

Collaborate with the Fiscal Agent/Consortium Perkins Director and all member districts to determine joint needs and formulate budget proposals that addresses those needs. Each member LEA is legally responsible to carry out the activities it agrees to perform and use funds and items that it receives through the consortium in accordance with federal requirements that apply to the grant. Each LEA will have one authorized representative participating on the consortium board.

  1. What are some responsibilities of consortium fiscal agent?
  • Arrange consortium planning meetings-
  • Account for funds received and maintain all records-
  • Gather all required information including budget justifications-
  • Submit the annual grant application and complete all reporting requirements on the behalf of the consortium.

The fiscal agent is responsible for the use of all grant funds and ensuring that the projects are carried out by the consortium members in accordance with federal law.

The Perkins Director/fiscal agent agrees to assist member LEAs through regular communication and provide leadership for the implementation of the Perkins grant.

  1. Who is responsible for maintaining fiscal records within the consortium, the fiscal agent or the individual schools within the consortium?

The fiscal agent must maintain all fiscal records of the consortium. It is recommended that member districts also retain budget records for costs incurred by the district. Documentation must be maintained by the fiscal agent to ensure that sub-granting or reallocating of funds back to consortium members is not occurring.

  1. Can the consortium fiscal agent charge administrative costs to the grant?

Yes, the Perkins Act has a maximum cap of 5% that can be taken on administrative costs and indirect costs combined. Administrative costs can be charged to the grant for grant management, administrative duties, record keeping, and program reports. Individuals who are paid from an indirect cost plan cannot charge time to the grant as their salaries come out of indirect costs. Time and effort documentation must be kept for all individuals who are paid salaries from the grant. Time and effort documentation must document time by cost objective and reflect 1003 of a person’s time.

  1. What if our district leaves our current consortium?

If your district does not meet the minimum allocation established by the Perkins Act, then the district must join a consortium.

A district may apply for a waiver but must be located in a rural area and demonstrate that the LEA is unable to enter into a consortium and that the LEA can provide programs that are sufficient in size, scope and quality. The LEA must also have the capacity to administer the grant and meet reporting requirements. All Perkins inventory is owned by the consortium and must be returned to the consortium that the district is leaving.

  1. If the goals and strategies of my consortium do not align with those of my district, can the district move to another consortium?

A request to change consortiums must be submitted to State Director of Career & Technical Education. Changes cannot be made during the middle of a grant year. The State Director will consult with the consortium the district proposes to leave to ensure that the change does not negatively impact the consortium’s eligibility per Section 1 31 of the Perkins Act. The State Director will also consult with the consortium that the district proposes to join to confirm the consortium’s acceptance of the new member district. If negative impacts are identified, the move may be denied.

This FAQ is intended to help answer some commonly asked questions regarding funding to Perkins consortia. If this document does not answer a question that you have, please contact the Division of Career & Technical Education for more information.

2019-2020 Virtual Technical Assistance

The 2019-2020 Virtual Technical Assistance for Perkins Meeting  (Transition Year)
Secondary and Postsecondary

View the 2019-2020 PowerPoint Presentation
This presentation was delivered three times in the Spring of 2018. Information provided included: introductions of new NCE staff, general updates, Perkins grant management, accounting & closeout processes, CTE data & research insights and outcomes, reVISION, and more!

Download the the VTAP presentation.

Object Code 100–Salaries/200–Benefits

Use of Perkins V money for personnel services and salaries is an approvable expense if it helps to accomplish the activities identified in the local application.

Administrative expenditures are limited to 5% of the total budget and can be spent for meeting general requirements of administering the grant (records retention, financial management). The system will provide the indirect cost rate for each district or ESU on the budget pages if selected as an option. The applicant must decide, for each program, whether to use indirect costs or not. If chosen, the system will figure the amount of indirect costs.

Note: if the budget includes equipment (capital outlay), this amount will be subtracted from the amount allowable for indirect costs as required by law.

Documentation of individual staff time must be kept at the local level, and detailed on the itemized printout submitted to NDE when claiming for reimbursement. Semi-annual time certification records are acceptable.

Grant funds can be used to pay staff for grant-related activities if the time spent is documented and justification is made for determining the rate of compensation. Under no circumstance is supplanting allowable.

Regular Salary/Benefits. When it is permissible to use funds for staff, expenditures must be limited to only that amount that is necessary to carry out the activity. Funds cannot be used to maintain staff; however, if funds are used to establish a new program, then funds could be used to provide instructional staff for a period of not more than three years.

Employee benefits are considered part of the personnel cost. These may include social security, retirement, health insurance, worker’s compensation, tax-sheltered annuities, and life insurance. Personnel who are chargeable to more than one program must be time certified, and time certification records should be kept on the local level. See the project sample in “Approved Application of Accounting Procedures” at the end of this chapter. Include all personnel that will be associated with the project. This may include the project contact person, instructors, aides, tutors and secretaries. The local application should include:

  • Name of person or position
  • How the salary and benefits were calculated
  • Total salary for the project

EXAMPLE
Pat Jones, a CTE teacher, is involved in an approved career education project to revise one course that is a part of the total career education program in the school. The plan included 1/8 of Pat’s time during the school year to field test the revised course.

Stipends/Extended Contract Time. Stipends may be paid to teachers or participants (other than students/clients) participating in inservice training or workshops if one of the following conditions is met:

  • There is a genuine need to pay stipends. Example: The inservice training or workshop is conducted after school hours, weekends or during the summer. Actual expenses may also be reimbursed in addition to the stipend.

Or

  • The stipend is paid in lieu of paying expenses (travel, registration, etc.) If stipends are paid, it will be necessary to check the IRS guidelines because under some circumstances stipends may be subject to Social Security and Income Tax withholding. Stipends and substitutes are paid at the local district’s established rate.

Substitute Teacher Salaries. Substitute teachers are an eligible expense if it allows for NCE teachers to participate in professional development activities.

Object code 300 Purchased Professional & Technical Services

This category is used for payment of fees to consultants or for professional and technical services.

Purchased services are allowable expenses, within reason, used to meet the intent of the program, and documented at the local level. Examples may include:

Professional & Technical Services. Services needed to carry out the activities as defined in the local application. This may include work of a subcontractor.

Subcontractors. The funded agency may enter into written agreements for part of the services to be provided under the local application. Such agreement will describe the services of the subcontractor and will contain provisions assuring that the funded agency will retain supervision and administrative control over the services. Services of the subcontractor agreement must be specified in the local application. If subcontractors are used, indicate their qualifications and specific responsibilities to the local agency.

Consultants. Consultant fees must be justified in the local application. Consulting fees plus travel, lodging and per diem shall conform to the funded agency’s written policy. Consultant travel, lodging and per diem must be itemized in the expenditure printout.

EXAMPLE
The ESU is sponsoring a one-day, multi-session, CTE Collaboration Day. This is a professional development event. Estimation is based upon 20 CTE teachers attending including mileage and substitute reimbursement for those on contract time. (Code 300: Mileage of $1000 + Substitute Reimbursement of $2200 = $3200). Anticipated CTE workshops throughout the year to enhance the engagement, instructional, and technological strategies for student success. (Code 300: Possible Mileage + Substitute reimbursement (contract time) OR Stipends (non-contract time).

Training.
The cost of training provided for teacher development is allowable. This may include the cost of meals and breaks subject to the Federal guidelines in OMB Circular A87, Attachment B.

Working Lunches
USDE, the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, references the OMB CircularsA-87 (Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments), CFR225, Attachment B (Selected Items of Cost), #27 (Meetings and Conferences) states:

Costs of meetings and conferences, the primary purpose of which is the dissemination of technical information is allowable. This includes the costs of meals, rental of facilities, and other items incidental to such meetings or conferences. The costs should be considered necessary and reasonable, and allocable and only when secondary to meetings, workshops or events, (e.g., the meal is not the purpose of the meeting).

  • NOTE: Expenses for advisers/sponsors attending student organization conferences and/or activities are a local responsibility and are not allowed as an eligible expenditure. This would be an example of supplanting local fiscal responsibility.

Object Code 400/500– Other Purchased Property Services

Services purchased to operate, repair, maintain, and rent property owned or used by the school district. These services are performed by persons other than school district employees. Although a product may or may not result from the transaction, the primary reason for the purchase is the service provided. Repair and/or maintenance of instructional equipment meeting these criteria is an eligible expenditure. General maintenance agreements for equipment not purchased under these criteria are not an eligible expenditure.

Expenses budgeted and reported here include travel, conference expenses and other activities that support the requirements of the legislation. Instate travel is allowable. Out-of-state travel is allowable if the grantee is unable to receive comparable information (a comparable service or conference) within the state. If the budget includes expenses for out of state travel, include justification under performance measures/planned activities. Examples of allowable expenses may include:

  • Personnel Travel
  • Board and lodging
  • Mileage (paid at the local district’s established rate)
  • Airfare (if appropriate)

Travel expenses are limited to mileage, airfare, meals and lodging.  Travel must be justified in terms of value of the travel to the successful completion of the local application.

Costs associated with participation in both in-state and out-of-state conferences are approvable as requested on the local application. The potential benefit to NCE programs should be identified on the local application for justification of conference participation.

Object code 600 – Supplies

Instructional Materials and Equipment (Instructional Equipment items <$5,000) Appropriate non-consumable instructional and curriculum materials include reference books, audio-visual materials, instructional software, curriculum and necessary duplication of materials. State the instructional materials/equipment to be purchased and the activities to be addressed. Supplies and materials are allowable expenditures, within reason, used to meet the intent of the program. Simply stating intent to purchase (for example, applied academics curriculum for consortium schools) is not adequate. Any instructional materials, software and equipment (both <$5,000 and >$5,000 per item) must be justified according to their ability to modernize, improve or expand the career and technical education offerings and align them with current industry standards and expectations. It is not permissible to buy residential grade equipment and seek Perkins reimbursement. Any equipment purchased (both <$5,000 and >$5,000 per item) must be industry grade and quality to be eligible for reimbursement.  Office supplies used specifically for Perkins purposes may include:

Instructional Software.  Instructional software is defined as software that is needed to improve the academic or technical skill development of students; is used for professional development of teachers; or to update technological resources available in the programs. Instructional materials, software and/or equipment must enhance instruction for students to gain knowledge and skills that meet industry standards and expectations in high wage, high skill and high demand occupations. Instructional materials, software or equipment used in hobby, craft or leisure arts courses are not approvable for reimbursement.

Instructional MaterialsInstructional materials must be non-consumable (student workbooks are not an approvable expense). Textbooks are considered a part of the regular school’s obligation and therefore are not approvable because of the federal guidelines on supplanting state and local resources except when the books or curriculum are purchased for developing new curriculum not previously offered. Supplanting occurs when the school is replacing textbooks of an existing program. Online working documents that are purchased as a per student fee are not eligible for reimbursement.

Instructional Equipment (Items <$5,000) Instructional equipment for this section costs less than $5,000 per individual unit and is described as a movable or portable item, an implement, a devise or a machine designed for a specific instructional purpose that meets the following conditions:

  • Retains its original shape and appearance with use and is non-consumable. (Consumable supplies that are not eligible include such things as plants, potting soil, welding rods/wire, welding gas, food, printer cartridges, paper, office supplies, lumber, etc.)
  • Equipment purchased using lease/purchase is approvable.
  • It is generally repairable.
  • Retains its identity.
  • It is a necessary adaptation to upgrade an existing item of equipment in order to be consistent with technology found in business and industry.

Object code 700 – Capital Assets (Equipment items >$5,000)

Capital Assets defined as equipment that costs more than $5,000 per individual item. It is not permissible to buy residential grade equipment and seek Perkins reimbursement. Any equipment purchased (both <$5,000 and >$5,000 per item) must be industry grade and quality to be eligible for reimbursement. Equipment is described as a movable or portable item, an implement, a device or a machine designed for a specific instructional purpose that meets the following conditions:

  • Retains its original shape and appearance with use and is non-consumable. (Consumable supplies that are not eligible include such things as plants, potting soil, welding rods/wire, welding gas, food, printer cartridges, paper, office supplies, lumber, etc.)
  • Equipment purchased using lease/purchase is approvable.
  • It is generally repairable.
  • Retains its identity.
  • It is a necessary adaptation to upgrade an existing item of equipment in order to be consistent with current technology found in business and industry.
  • Repair and/or maintenance of instructional equipment meeting these criteria is an eligible expenditure. General maintenance agreements for equipment not purchased under these criteria are not an eligible expenditure.
  • All equipment must be housed within career education programs, not in general use computer or learning labs. Equipment purchased with federal funds must be used for career education instruction purposes. For example, computers purchased using federal funds may not be used for general school clerical/office work.
  • Equipment purchased by a consortium must be maintained and inventoried by the consortium.
  • All equipment purchases must be shown on an itemized printout that is submitted with the final claim for reimbursement.
  • All equipment must be housed within career education programs, not in general use computer or learning labs. Equipment purchased with federal funds must be used for career education instruction purposes. For example, computers purchased using federal funds may not be used for general school clerical/office work or library computer labs.
  • All equipment must be tagged designating the source of funding as Perkins.
  • Equipment purchased by a stand-alone/consortium must be maintained and inventoried by the stand-alone/consortium using the local inventory process.
  • Periodic review or request of inventory list may occur through monitoring.
  • All equipment purchases must be detailed and shown on an itemized printout that is submitted with the final claim for reimbursement. An inventory must be maintained, which includes the make, model number, serial number, school/consortium inventory number and depreciation schedule, until the item is depreciated. The depreciation schedule used should be the same as the school depreciation schedule. In the absence of a local depreciation schedule, NDE defaults to IRS guidelines. Inventory is maintained at the consortium level.

In the case of food and food science labs, residential grade equipment may be purchased with Perkins funds to modernize or expand career and technical education offerings. However, any equipment (free standing or counter top) purchased must demonstrate or showcase the most recent technology within the equipment category.  For example: a low end, coil burner, electric range does not demonstrate or showcase the most recent technology in electric ranges.  Residential grade washers/dryers, salt and pepper shakers, flatware, spatulas, private label products sold through home parties outlets, used/damaged or discounted because of damage, light grade plastic products (bowl toppers), etc., are not approvable and are the responsibility of the local school.

Items of equipment with an original purchase unit price of $5,000 or more must be identified in the Capital Assets category on the local application consolidated budget and final claim form. An inventory must be maintained that includes the make, model number, serial number, school/consortium inventory number and depreciation schedule, until the value of the item is less than $5,000. See sample inventory tag in the section Use of Perkins Funds for Instructional Materials, Software and/or Equipment Examples of this manual.

The depreciation schedule used should be the same as the school depreciation schedule. In the absence of a local depreciation schedule, NDE defaults to IRS guidelines.

Equipment items with a current unit value of $5,000 or more cannot be disposed of without approval from the Nebraska Department of Education. Disposal of items is defined as sale, trade-in, transfer, exchange or loan. If disposal is approved, the federal share of the equipment must be used for approved career and technical education purposes or returned to NDE for reallocation.

If an item of equipment is stolen, copies of letters should be submitted to the Nebraska Department of Education to document the notification and action of law enforcement officers.

Test for Allowable Use of Funds: instructional materials, software and/or equipment must enhance instruction for students to gain knowledge and skills that meet industry standards and expectations in high wage, high skill and high demand occupations.

Career & Technical Student Organizations

Career Technical Student Organizations

Awards

Awards for recognition of students, advisors or other individuals are not approvable including:

    • Cash Awards
    • Medals/Pins
    • Plaques
    • Ribbons
    • Advisor/Student registration fees to events, conferences, activities
    • Dues (student or advisor)
    • Food for students
    • Jackets/uniform apparel
    • Lodging for students
    • Printing and disseminating of non-instructional materials
    • Supplies
    • Start-up kits
    • Student/Advisor expenses at CTSO conferences
    • Transportation of students to CTSO conferences

Non-CTE Courses or Activities

Expenditures for students not enrolled in CTE are not approvable.

Consumables

Consumable supplies or equipment

Standard classroom consumable and not allowable supplies including but not limited to:

  • CO2 cartridges
  • Drill bits
  • Food
  • Ink
  • Lumber
  • Office supplies (e.g., markers, glue, shears, thank-you notes)
  • Paper
  • Plants
  • Potting soil
  • Printer cartridges
  • Replacement batteries
  • Safety glasses/goggles
  • Toner cartridges including extra cartridges purchased with a new printer
  • Welding rods/wire
  • Welding gloves/jackets
  • Whiteboards individualized for students
  • Workbooks

Consumable Instructional Materials

Any instructional materials that are consumable (one-use only) or that are retained by the student are not approvable.

Workbooks or “consumable” items are not approvable

Entertainment

Entertainment

Meals, Entertainment or Social Activities

(There is a high burden of proof to justify the expenditure of Perkins funds for a meal. Please refer to the Nebraska Grants Management Manual for more details)

Non-allowable expenditures for entertainment or social activities include:

  • Beverages
  • Lodging
  • Meals Non-working Lunches
  • Transportation
  • Gratuities
  • Gifts, giveaways, promotional materials

Banquets and meals are considered entertainment expenses are not approvable. Working lunches (such as for an advisory committee) and that are essential to the meeting and the agenda reflects that work is taking place are permissible.

 

Alcoholic Beverages are not allowable (see EDGAR 2CFR, Section 200.423)

Promotional materials are not approvable

Examples:

  • Banners
  • Cups/glasses
  • Advertising
  • Folders or bags Gratuitous items
  • Key chains
  • Public Relations Costs
  • T-shirts

— Gifts (of any kind)

  • Notepads
  • Pens/Pencils

Is buying food an allowable expenditure?

The OMB Circulars A-87 regulation basically states that the costs of meetings and conferences of which the primary purpose is the dissemination of technical information allows for working lunches only, transportation, rental of facilities, speaker fees and some incidental items. The costs should also be considered necessary and reasonable and written in the grant as part of a CTE activity. The approved CTE activity should have an agenda that reflects the work that is taking place and considered necessary to the primary purpose of disseminating technical information.

Refreshment breaks or breakfasts are not approvable.

Please always consider if this is the best use of limited funds; necessary and reasonable.

Equipment/Capital Assets

Construction

Construction or renovation costs

Construction costs and materials for a permanent structure (e.g., greenhouse) or anything that becomes a part of a permanent structure are not allowable expenditures

Installation

Expenses for installing equipment or materials including wiring are not approvable. Perkins funds may be used for professional development for the use or set-up of

 

Equipment

Expenditures for equipment that are not specifically used for approved career technical education courses/programs of study and are housed in appropriate CTE classrooms/labs/workshops are not allowable.

Equipment must be inventoried and clearly labeled as purchased with Perkins funds.

Equipment that is used for general administrative or personal use is not allowed.

Equipment that is mounted or becomes a part of a building or structure is not allowed.

Equipment warranties and service contracts beyond the current grant year are not allowed.

This includes any warranties on computers or other electronic items that are considered supplies.

Equipment and supplies needed for building maintenance are not allowed.

Equipment—repair, or replacement of lost, stolen or broken

The cost of replacing or repairing federally funded equipment that is lost, stolen or broken is the responsibility of the grant recipient

Equipment that is hobby, craft or non-occupational is not approvable.

Equipment for CTE school-based enterprises are allowable if industry grade.

 

Maintenance contracts or agreements

These contracts or agreements are not approvable. This includes repair plans that may be purchased when purchasing a piece of equipment

Repair expenditures

Repairs (e.g., car repairs) are not allowable

Storage

Storage files or cabinets are not approvable

Equipment—uncommon

  • Animal Cages/Containment Units
  • Approvable only if industry/commercial grade that have a long time-span for use as in multiple years.
  • Airplanes (Nebraska does not currently have a program of study)
  • Food dehydrator
    Exception would be the written rationale for the item and whether or not it is a part of the Food Science courses.
  • Automobiles
  • Chicken Tractor

Computers

Computers must be of industry standard that are found in the business world. Chromebooks are not approvable for purchase with Perkins Funds.

Culinary/Kitchen Tools

Basic kitchen and culinary tools are not approvable. This includes flatware, dishes, food containers, spatulas, whisks, etc. Any tools or equipment for culinary must be industry grade and commonly found in professional culinary kitchens.

Residential type kitchen tools are not allowable (e.g., salt and pepper shakers, flatware, dishes, spatulas, private label products sold through home party outlets, light-grade plastic products)

Equipment MUST be industry grade and quality and demonstrate or showcase the most recent technology within the category. Examples of residential grade equipment that would not be allowable include:

  • Electric ranges (Low end, coil burner)
  • Washers/dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Pressure canners
  • Food dehydrators (unless they are industry-grade)
  • Quilting machines
  • Embroidery machines (unless industry grade and tied directly to a school-based enterprise)

 

Tools

Basic Tools

Basic hand tools or tools that would not be considered innovative are not allowable e.g.

Chisels Pliers Vise Grips
Clamps Punches Wrenches
Gardening Tools Rasps Boring Sets
Hammers Screwdrivers Reamers
Hand Saws Tape Measures Thread Taps
Levels Trouble Lights

Ergonomic and/or state-of-the-art tools and tool kits that are part of an innovative program that combines rigorous academic instruction with career education are allowable.

 

Furniture

Furniture is not approvable. Furniture required to make reasonable accommodation for a student with disabilities may be approvable

Furniture that is designed to collapse and add flexible workspace is nonessential, would be considered classroom furniture so would not be allowable.

Exception: if the furniture is unique to a tool or piece of equipment and is required for that tool or equipment to operate safely and properly, furniture may be approvable.

Fiscal Expenses

Fiscal Expenses

Audits

The cost of a general school/institution audit is not permissible BUT the portion directly attributable to auditing the Perkins grant may be charged against the 5% administration category

Capital Expenditures

Building modifications, attachments, accessories, construction (including plumbing, wiring, HVAC, etc.) or land purchases are not approvable

Computers

Computers must be of industry standard that are found in the business world. Chromebooks are not approvable for purchase with Perkins Funds.

Contributions and donations to contingency or “petty cash” funds

These contributions and funds are not approvable

CTE Teacher and Staff Salaries

Perkins funds may support a teacher and/or staff member’s salary, however the State has a “three-year rule” on salaries using Perkins funding. A CTE related position will be funded for three years only. It is the responsibility of the local board of education to sustain this position after the first three years.

Dues

Dues to professional or other organizations are not approvable.

Fines and penalties

Fines and penalties of any type are not approvable

Fund-raising

Perkins funds are not allowed to be used for fundraising

Insurance

Building, equipment or personal/institutional insurance is not allowable

Interest and other financial costs

Any interest paid or other financial costs such as audits are not approvable

Legal Fees

Legal Fees and expenses are allowable only as necessary for the administration of the grant program
Retainer fees are not allowable costs
Legal expenses for claims against the federal or state government are not allowable

Memberships

Memberships in civic or community organizations are not allowed

Instructional Materials

Instructional Materials

Career Information System Subscriptions

Because Nebraska provides a statewide career information system (Nebraska Career Connections) that is partially funded with Perkins funds, subscriptions to other career information systems are not approvable with Perkins funds.

Certifications or Certification Exams

Perkins funds may not be used to pay for an individual certification or certification exams or tests as this is considered a benefit to individual students. Perkins funds may not be used for industry recognized certifications. (This applies to students and teachers. I.e., Microsoft Office Specialist Certification licensing, OSHA Construction Safety Certification)

* MOS Certification Practice Tests (GMetrix) licensing may be allowable.

*Professional development is approvable as long as it is not credit bearing.

College Preparatory Courses or Materials and On-line college prep tests

These would be considered a direct benefit to the student and are not approvable.

Consumable Instructional Materials

Any instructional materials that are consumable (one-use only) or that are retained by the student are not approvable.

Distance Learning Fees

Fees associated with operation of distance learning are not approvable as it provides a direct benefit to students.

Electronic Instructional Materials*

*Subscription-based fees that supplement CTE classroom instruction CAN be purchased

Instructional aides/materials to be retained by or that become the property of the student are not approvable.

Software for Use Outside the CTE Classroom/Lab

Instructional materials, software or equipment that is used in hobby, craft or leisure arts courses are not approvable for reimbursement. Software is only approvable if it is for use in career-technical skill enhancement directly tied to the CTE program of study and directly to instruction in the classroom/laboratory/workshop. Perkins funds cannot be used to purchase software or upgrades for additional alternative uses (e.g., software such as Striv, Wirecast Pro or other software used for videography or editing for athletic or other school activities such as plays, performances, etc.)

Subscriptions

Subscriptions to magazines or journals are not approvable.

Textbooks

Textbooks are not approvable expenditures

Exception: Textbooks and instructional materials for new programs or new courses that are part of a new program of study not previously provided by the school provided the curriculum is tied to current industry standards. (Workbooks or “consumable” items are not approvable)

Journalism courses or materials

Journalism is not a part of a CTE program of study.

Printing Costs

Printing costs are allowable when they are reasonable and necessary. Any multi-color printing must be reasonable in cost and must be necessary to carry out the objectives of the grant program. Promotional Items, Memorabilia, and Souvenirs Promotional items, memorabilia, and souvenirs are not allowable costs.

Other/Middle School

Other

Maintenance contracts or agreements

These contracts or agreements are not approvable. This includes repair plans that may be purchased when purchasing a piece of equipment.

Printing Costs

Printing costs are allowable when they are reasonable and necessary. Any multi-color printing must be reasonable in cost and must be necessary to carry out the objectives of the grant program. Promotional Items, Memorabilia, and Souvenirs Promotional items, memorabilia, and souvenirs are not allowable costs.

Repair expenditures

Repairs (e.g., car repairs) are not allowable

Storage

Storage files or cabinets are not approvable

Vehicles

Purchase or leasing of automobiles, trucks, buses, airplanes, boats, golf carts, motorcycles, tractors, trailers

Supplanting

Using Perkins funds to provide services the recipient is required to make available under other federal, state or local laws
Or
using Perkins funds to provide services the recipient provided with state or local funds in the prior or previous years.

Middle School

Middle school (5-8 ) expenditures for hobby, craft, leisure arts, or other non-occupational, exploration or preparation courses

Middle school (5-8) purchases would be allowable ONLY if they are to modernize, improve or expand CTE offerings AND align them to current industry standards and expectations. Must also be used for a course or courses that enhance instruction for students to gain knowledge and skills that meet industry standards and certifications in high wage, high skills and demand occupations. The key is career skills development (not family or personal development) aligned to business/industry standards and focus on H3 careers.

Pre-5th grade

No funds can be used to provide career education programs to students prior to the 5th grade (pre-5th grade students CAN use equipment in NCE classes that was purchased for 5-12 students).

Non-CTE Courses or Activities

Expenditures for students not enrolled in CTE are not approvable.

Dues/Memberships/Travel

Dues/Membership Fees

Memberships for students, faculty, or administration for career and technical student organizations, professional organizations or societies.

Postsecondary fees

Any fees for students or teachers related to postsecondary education are not approvable.

Travel

Student Related Travel

Travel related to CTSO or student activities is not approvable. However, Travel costs (transportation only) for CTE students to attend field trips and laboratory experiences directly related to preapproved career education activities are permissible.

Travel outside of the US

Any travel outside the United States is not approvable with Perkins Funds

Professional Development

Professional Development

Memberships for students, faculty, or administration for career and technical student organizations, professional organizations or societies.

Postsecondary fees

Any fees for students or teachers related to postsecondary education are not approvable.

Conferences (CTE Conferences only are permissible)

Conference registration fees for teachers to attend a CTE-focused professional development workshop, seminar or conference are permissible.

Non CTE-focused Conference Expenses

Perkins can only pay for the expenses of CTE teachers, School Counselors or Perkins Administrators attending conferences that are directly related to CTE instruction.

See Record Keeping/Time and Effort Regulations below. All Federal grants (IDEA, Title, Perkins, Homeless, Migrant, Early Childhood, etc.) that claim salaries/wages for reimbursement are required to submit time and effort logs with their final submission.
Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) requires an employee whose salary and wages are supported, in whole or in part with Federal funds to document his/her time spent working on Federal programs in order to ensure charges to each Federal program reflect an accurate account of the employee’s time and effort devoted to that program.
(Any payment must not be for time worked during regular contract, non-grant time.)

The CFR addresses two types of documentation: semiannual certifications and personnel activity reports.

Budget Questions

Do I have to include administrative costs (limited to 5%) in the grant?

You do not have to include administrative costs.  However, if you do, you do need to do time certification.

Is it o.k. to split coding?

If a purchase total cost was above $5,000, it would need to budgeted and paid as a capital expenditure even if the amount paid from Perkins funds was under $5,000.  The district’s inventory records should also note the split coding.

In a Consortium, there would be concerns that it would be indeterminate who would be responsible for depreciation, resale, inventory, etc.

Equipment purchased by a consortium remains the property of the consortium.

What are considered DIRECT costs?

Institutions can only claim up to 5% for direct or indirect costs under the 300 object code and if the amount is budgeted. Direct costs can be identified specifically with particular cost objectives such as  grant, contract, project, function or activity.

  • Salaries and wages
  • Other employee fringe benefits allocated to direct labor employees.
  • Consultant services contracted to accomplish specific grant objectives.
  • Travel of employees.
  • Materials, supplies and equipment purchased directly for use on a specific grant or contract.
  • Communication costs identifiable with a specific award or activity.

Can we use our 5% Administrative costs allotment to pay for Advisory Meeting related expenses?

Yes.  Administrative costs must be associated with the direct administration of the local application. Costs are limited to no more than 5% of total allocation. Approved indirect costs are considered administrative costs and must be included in the 5% limitation. Documentation of actual expenses must be maintained to claim the 5% administrative cost. Budget and reporting of the direct administrative expenditures should appear in the appropriate object code. Expenses associated with conducting an advisory committee meeting may be considered a direct or indirect administrative cost. This may include lunch associated with the meeting.

Can payments for a grant item purchased in June or earlier be paid after July 1?

Allowable obligations prior to June 30th are allowable for claims for that grant year although the payment isn’t processed until July 1 or shortly thereafter.

Even though a Grant Award is dated July 1, grant applicants cannot legally expend funds until the grants are approved. Competitive Grants over $25,000 are approved at the Nebraska State Board meetings and go into effect on that date. Funds expended before the grant was approved would trigger an audit issue.

Can Perkins funds be used to pay for a school counselor to attend a conference that is held the last few days of June and into July (the start of a new Grant Award)?

Federal Guidelines 76.707 states that personal services by an employee of the State or a sub-grantee are obligated when the services are performed. So the contracted services payment could only be for the days prior to the end of the fiscal year out of the current fiscal year’s grant.

If a purchase order was signed and dated prior to June 30th, the end of the grant period, can it be paid for after July 1st with those prior year’s funds?

Yes, however the item should be received and the payment should be made in a very timely manner so that the grant does not need to be left open for an extended period of time.

If I have an invoice with a date of July 15th, is this considered a “Purchase Date” after July 1?

Not necessarily. The Purchase Date is the encumbrance date, or “Purchase Order” date.

Under Category 300, Professional & Technical Services, what exactly can the grant reimburse?

Costs associated with participation in both in-state and out-of-state conferences are approvable as requested in the Local Perkins Application. Personnel travel is limited to mileage, airfare, meals and lodging. Travel must be justified in terms of value.

Cost of training provided for teacher development is allowable. This may include cost of meals subject to the federal guidelines. No entertainment expenses such as alcohol, movies, etc., may be reimbursed.

Can a clerical person’s time spent on administration of the grant be funded through Perkins?

Yes, as long as positive time certification records are kept and the amount is under the 5% cap.

Can Perkins fund the salary for a full-time CTE position?

Yes, however it needs to be a “new” position and can only support the salary for up to 3 years.  *If the position was previously ½ time and the objective is to increase to full-time, only ½ the salary can be funded for up to 3 years.

Can we spend money on a school that won’t open until the following year?

That decision would fall on the Consortia’s grant manager. If you are working to improve your CTE programs and systems then this would be like purchasing new curriculum to be used the following year. Instructors would need to work with the materials and have training before actually teaching it. Also make sure the expense is adequately reflected in your application.

Can funds be used for salaries not considered “Administration”, e.g., substitute teachers so that teachers can receive professional development in Career Ed academies and training expenditures so that a teacher can become a career academy leader?

Yes, it is allowable.

If a salaried position is for a Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker program, or a Single Parent Student Services Specialist, or a Disability and/or a Support Services Counselor, can Perkins funds be used to support these positions?

Yes, if these positions are only providing direct services to CTE Students who are considered members of a special population and who are enrolled in CTE courses during the semester for which they receive services (they would have been reported in the year-end reporting as either a CTE participant or concentrator)? Documentation would need to be submitted to show how these activities lead students to earning a credential/certificate/degree in an H3 occupational area. Also, remember that Perkins funds can only be used for salaries to support staff for up to 3 years.

We have a new position to be funded with Perkins Funds. If we hire this person in March, will that count as year 1 towards the 3-year funding limit?

This position would be reviewed within each application over the 3 years, so yes, even though the salary would only be for 4 months of the grant, it would still count as year 1.

Can Perkins funds be used to pay a teacher to teach zoology at a career academy?

No, this would not be allowable. Zoology is not part of an approved program of study.

Can Perkins funds be used to support an aligned academic class offered as a part of a career academy?

No, however the academic instructor may participate in professional development if it is also offered to CTE instructors.

Can a percentage of the consortium’s allocation be used to pay for each of its districts’ membership fees with a vendor?

Yes, however, just like any other expenditure the fee must align with the overarching CTE plan for the consortium and is considered an allowable expense. A vendor must provide a description of exactly what the fees are for, detailed information on any personnel services charged to the grant and the item’s purpose.

Can a school receive reimbursement for an on-line college-prep test that is used in the guidance program?

No. This is considered a direct benefit to students; nor is it a curriculum that can be reused. Perkins funds are not to be used to pay for any testing, licensure, or certification of students.

Can a consortium agree to distribute the money equally between all districts using all the money for the same programs that are mutually beneficial? Or can a consortium agree to distribute the money on a per pupil rate?

No. This would be considered a grant-back program since allocations are based on student population and poverty within the allocations formula. Neither does the money belong to individual schools, but to the consortium. Dividing the money between the schools would also be an audit exception.

The Perkins grant is designed to not directly benefit students, making the number of students in a district a non-factor.

Perkins is about the programs offered, not the number of students taking the programs. Not following the Legislative Guidelines could remove a consortium’s eligibility from the grant.

Due to inclement weather, (or the 2020 Corona Virus) activities were cancelled and I have leftover funds in my budget. Do I need to create an amendment?

If you reallocate funds because of a cancelled event and it adds to less than 25% of the available funds AND it is used within the same category, you will not need an amendment. Funds moved to a different category WILL need an amendment.

Be sure to keep your NDE monitor informed of the new purchase/activity so a cross-reference can be made on the Final Claim for Reimbursement. The best record is to add in a detailed description of the changes within the GMS system’s Amendment Description tab.

Is it okay to purchase a different item than what was originally requested in our Application? Do I need to create an amendment?

Adjustments to original purchase requests are allowable as long as they are approvable under Perkins law and meet your justification requirements. If the items fall into the same budget category (supplies, for instance), you would not need to do anything in GMS.

If the purchases will fall into a different category than originally purchased, and you need to move remaining funds from one category to the other to have enough to cover the costs, you’ll need to submit an amendment in GMS with the explanation.

Finally, the purchase should be fine using current grant funds as long as they are obligated by June 30.

Example: Current Budget 600 Category $43,391.00
25% of $43,391.00 equals $10,847.75
This is larger than $2500 so you work with the 25% amount option.
No amendment is necessary if you use a budgeted amount up to $52,238.75.

I need to move money because my invoice is higher than I had originally written, but everything is still budgeted under the same category. Do I need to create an amendment?

No. Not when the budget amount and the category remain the same.

I want to move money from a 400 category to a 600 category. However there was nothing budgeted in 600 from the beginning of the year’s plan. Is it a problem to now shift money to a new category? I read there are warnings about “no flexibility”.

It is permissible to make budget changes if the changes meet the program’s plan. The warning of “no flexibility” is to inform you that you cannot post any expenditures in an object code with $0.00 budgeted. With an Amendment, funds can be moved into a new category that previously had none.

Can we have a technician repair a piece of equipment? Should we use funds in the 400 Object Code?

Yes.

Conferences and Professional Development

Can Perkins funds be used for pay for the professional development of CTE and/or core academic teachers that are part of a technical science academy teacher externship?

Yes, however we would need to have a very clear rationale for paying them including the purpose of the payment, their responsibilities (in an academy) and how the professional development aligns to the program offered.

We will need to know more about the academy and the actual externship they have in mind (alignment to program offered, description of the outcomes from the professional development.)

Can Perkins funds be used to pay for a speaker whose topic is centered on a Career Field?

It would be appropriate to spend Perkins funds for a speaker whose content can be directly tied to course/program of study standards/benchmarks for one or more career fields and/or career readiness standards identified in our CTE Career Readiness Standards.

NSCA (Nebraska School Counselor Academy) Can Perkins support school counselors to attend the annual NSCA?

Yes, Perkins funds can be used to support school counselors in their attendance if there are career guidance sessions offered at the conference and they participate in these sessions.

Can Perkins pay for registration and costs of attending a conference that centers on Special Needs students or general education improvement?

No. Perkins can only pay for the expenses of CTE teachers centered directly on CTE activities. The conference would need to be a CTE-based conference.

NATS (Nebraska Academy of Teachers of Science) - Can we pay for teachers to attend the NATS conference and be reimbursed?

Yes, if the agenda is CTE focused professional development. A math or science teacher that is going to support the implementation of contextualizing their curriculum for a CTE course would be allowable.

NETA (Nebraska Educational Technology Association) The district sent teachers to the NETA conference and some were CTE; some taught just technology classes; and some were administration. Can all those be reimbursed?

No. Only CTE teachers may be reimbursed. Other teachers would need to justify how the conference would be used to directly improve CTE programs.

Also, Principals and Administrators are typically on contract and would not qualify for stipends.

An English teacher and a business teacher, collaborate on classroom projects that unite literacy skills in a business context. This English teacher also assists with FBLA projects and is very interested in being better able to collaborate further with CTE educators. She'd like to attend the NCE Conference with the business teacher. Can we support this request?

Perkins funds are specifically for supporting CTE programs. Academic staff can be included if they are an integral part of the CTE program of study/activity. In other words, “the primary focus needs to be CTE staff.”

Can Professional Development be provided for Core Academic teachers, Counselors and Administrators in conjunction with CTE instructors?

Perkins funds are specifically for supporting CTE programs. Academic staff can be included if they are an integral part of the CTE program of study/activity. In other words, “the primary focus needs to be CTE staff.”

Can workshop registrations designed for new teachers, including new CTE teachers, be reimbursed?

Perkins funds must be used to advance career and technical education. Registrations to workshops not specifically designed for Career and Technical education are not reimbursable.

Can Perkins funds be used to support Team Building for the Career Ed leadership team by purchasing profiles such as DISC, StrengthsFinder or Myers-Briggs?

In most cases, no. Perkins funds should be used specifically for CTE purposes. Team-building is the responsibility of the District.
Although this is professional development, it is not professional development for a CTE program.

Can I pay staff for attending a “Return to Industry” experience where they spend a few days in industry learning alongside our industry partners increasing their ability and skill?

Yes, IF they are not on contract, e.g., if the experience occurred during the summer.

A school counselor will be attending the American School Counseling Conference this summer. The dates June 28-July 2. Can she be paid for all 5 days out of the current grant dollars?

Federal Guidelines 76.707 (When Obligations are Made) states that personal services by an employee of the state or a sub-grantee are obligated when the services are performed. So the contracted services payment could only be for the days prior to the end of the fiscal year (June 28-30) out of that fiscal year’s grant.

Can I pay for registration in the current fiscal year’s grant period that is for a conference held in the next year’s grant period?

Yes, IF the conference is scheduled to be held relatively soon after the grant period ended (e.g., in the month of July) and IF the advantages to registering before June 30 are to save significant grant dollars (e.g., Early Bird registration).

Requests to pay for the cost of local advisers attending CTSO conferences.

While the standard policy is “no – that is a local responsibility,” we have some clarification from the USDE:

If a district wants to go through the process of breaking out the percentage of expenses and time certifying, they could get reimbursed for the professional development component of the conference. This is professional development beyond the competitions – not a session on how to prepare your students for competition.

Perkins can pay for time and travel for professional development that improves teaching and learning – not the supervision of students or competition preparation. We would need proof that the adviser attends those sessions and is not just there to supervise students and watch the competitions.

Perkins could reimburse expenses for that percentage of time, but not the entire trip because supervision of students is a local responsibility and expense. (If we paid for their time and expenses, it could imply our responsibility if there is a student issue. This also applies to a person who wants to attend a conference before starting a chapter – again, we could only pay for that portion that is directly related to professional development.

Equipment and Capital Assets

Can we have a technician repair a piece of equipment? Should we use funds in the 400 Object Code?

Yes.

Is equipment and software that is used for media production (business and technology) allowable?

The equipment would only be allowable depending on what is written in the application to how it is intended to being used within the curriculum. The software would not be allowable if the software would be used outside the classroom (i.e., school events, athletic games, etc.) or for Journalism courses.

Can a piece of equipment that has been “gently used” be purchased with Perkins funds?

Used equipment may be procured with Perkins funds, however this is approvable only if industry/commercial grade and has a long time-span for use as in multiple years.

Depreciation?

Items purchased with Perkins funds can be disposed of following the school’s own “Accounting Depreciation Procedure for Disposing of School Inventory.”  In most cases it means keeping track of the item in their accounting records for 5-7 years. (5 years for a Perkins federal audit.) *The key is the actual value of the equipment now, not the depreciated value.

Equipment that is no longer functional and can’t be upgraded or updated essentially has a value of “0”. Keep documentation on file that indicates the item, inventory number and explanation that it has no value and was disposed of on such and such date.

Equipment with a depreciated value of “0” can be sold, however documentation must be on file and the proceeds have to refunded into the CTE program.

NDE’s policy is that we don’t determine the depreciation cycle for equipment.  That is left up to the ESU or District. Three years is reasonable for the depreciation cycle for equipment.

Can “unusual” equipment be purchased such as animal cages/containments to assist in teaching animal care and handling?

Anything purchased needs to follow all the same Perkins guidelines regarding its industry standard/commercial grade, inventorying, labeling and depreciation.

Can Perkins be used for commercial equipment that is used to furnish a student-run business?

Entrepreneurship classes and/or school-based enterprises expenditures (that fall within the allowable expenditure category; in other words they aren’t on the non-allowable list) are allowable.

Can Perkins funds be used to pay for “part” of a piece of equipment?

Yes. If a purchase total cost is above $5,000, it would need to budgeted and paid as a capital expenditure even if the amount paid from Perkins funds is under $5,000.  The district’s inventory records should note the split coding.

Would a flammable storage cabinet be considered furniture? What about an Eyewear sanitizing cabinet?

The flammable storage cabinet is acceptable even though it is considered furniture. It is a specialty piece of furniture with a specific purpose for CTE for safety in the workshop. It is also has to be industry grade and required by OSHA (even though schools do not fall under OSHA regulations). The other cabinet would not be an allowable expenditure.

If CTE equipment/supplies are to be loaned out for individual student use, what processes should we have in place?

Purchased tools or tool kits would need to be

  • labeled as district property
  • labeled as purchased with Perkins funds
  • only loaned to students for the duration of the course and
  • returned to the district

Can the cost of returning any Perkins purchased supplies or equipment that was ordered in error be paid for with the Perkins grant?

No.

Expense Reimbursements

Travel expenses can only be reimbursed from the grant funds that are in place when the travel occurs. Example: if travel occurs in July, the expenses would be reimbursed from the grant that was awarded July 1.

Even though purchasing tickets before the travel date saves money, they are not reimbursable until they’ve been used. (The travel has to be for CTE centered purposes.)

*Registration fees can be paid out of the current grant and travel expenses from the upcoming grant if the activity occurs relatively soon (1 week?) after the registration.

Reimbursing expenditures for Career Education Advisory Board members to the National Career Academy Conference is an allowable expenditure.

Reimbursing a Science teacher to attend a Project Lead The Way engineering/science course is allowable if the course will be for CTE.

Can I pay for registration in the current fiscal year’s grant period that is for a conference held in the next year’s grant period?

Yes, IF the conference is scheduled to be held relatively soon after the grant period ended (e.g., in the month of July) and IF the advantages to registering before June 30 are to save significant grant dollars (e.g., Early Bird registration).

What travel expenses are allowable for reimbursement?

Written policies and procedures for employees who travel on Perkins funds should be in place. Employees may be reimbursed for actual costs not to exceed the per diem rates.
Mileage – only allowable for travel necessary to carry out the objectives of the grant.
Airfare- allowable at the lowest fare available.
Car Rental- only if performing official business other transportation is not available or cost is more effective than alternate modes of travel. Gasoline for the rental car is allowable.
Airport Parking– is allowable
Taxi (other fares)- is allowable for official business
Itemized Miscellaneous– for carrying out official business are allowable
Registration fees– are allowable. Social events or recreational events at a cost above the basic registration fee may not be paid from grant funds.

What travel expenses are non-allowable for reimbursement?

Written policies and procedures for employees who travel on Perkins funds should be in place. Employees may be reimbursed for actual costs not to exceed the per diem rates.
Foreign Travel
Per Diem (meals and lodging)
– for meeting,  conference, or workshop participants who live in the same city where the event is held. (Automobile mileage is allowable).
First Class Airfare
Alcoholic Beverages
Entertainment, recreational or social events
Expenses for other persons
Mileage for other than official business including fares.
Personal accident insurance or personal effects coverage for rental cars
Rental car for personal use or for purposes not associated with the official business of the meeting, conference or workshop

Middle School Questions

Instructional materials, software, or equipment that is used in hobby, craft, leisure-arts, or other non-occupational, exploration or preparation courses are not approvable for reimbursement.

If the items are for career exploration for a middle school class that specifically addresses health sciences or human services careers (not personal life skills, parenting skills, etc., personal health) then they would be approvable.

Always review items with the middle school teacher(s) with the above criteria in mind.  The key is career skills development (not family or personal development) that is aligned to business/industry standards and focus on H3 careers.

Can Realty Works or Real Care Babies (Baby Think it Over) be purchased with Perkins funds?

These products are not allowable for a teen parents program. The use of the requested materials must directly relate to the current standards and a FACs Programs of Study course (e.g. Child Development courses in Early Childhood Education and Services). This would be approvable however; the teacher that would be using the materials must attend the training offered by the manufacturer to teach the courses using best practices for the materials. There is typically a fee for this training.

Can approvable equipment be bought with Perkins funds that will be housed in a middle-school building: grades 5-8?

Regarding the middle school program purchases, purchases would be allowable ONLY if they are to modernize, improve, or expand the career and technical education offerings and align them with current industry standards and expectations.  They must also be used for a course or courses that enhance instruction for students to gain knowledge and skills that meet industry standards and certifications in high wage, high skill and high demand occupations.

Programs of Study

Is it OK to expend grant funds for a “Local” program of study?

NDE will need documentation about the career opportunities in order to pre-approve.

Can we spend money on a school that won’t open until the following year?

That decision would fall on the Consortia’s grant manager. If you are working to improve your CTE programs and systems then this would be like purchasing new curriculum to be used the following year. Instructors would need to work with the materials and have training before actually teaching it. Also make sure the expense is adequately reflected in your application.

Record Keeping/Time and Effort Regulations

How many years of records do schools need to keep? How many years of records do Consortia need to keep?

For stand-alones, the local district’s depreciation schedule and disposal policies apply.

NDE recommends five years from the end date of when the final expenditure report is received. For example, the July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 grant year’s final expenditure report should be received by October 1, 2021. The retention date would then be 5 years from that date or October 1, 2026.

There is a Federal requirement for submitting Time and Effort log sheets to NDE. What exactly does NDE require for records?

The easiest thing to remember to submit is a sample of what was sent to the Payroll Office for coding and payment against the grant when closing out the grant.

It is June 15th and our Accountant already processed June payroll. Should a special payroll check be issued or can this stipend be paid in July’s payroll? What about Time and Effort reporting?

If it is June’s time worked on a June Time Sheet, you can allow it as an obligation for a payment being made in July. Time and Effort reporting would follow.

We understood that we are only required to provide what the grant award states. In looking at the grant, it doesn't specifically reference time logs, but mentions providing supporting documentation and meeting the requirements of the approved Perkins plans. We just want to be sure we are in compliance.

Supporting documentation would have to comply with 2 CFR 200 Subpart E-Cost Principles, the NDE’s recommended practice to ensure you are in compliance with Federal regulations.  If there is doubt in the level of documentation, there could be a potential return of grant funds per the Terms and Conditions of Award on the Grant Award Notification in the Grants Management System.

If a teacher works part-time in more than one district under the same consortium, can that teacher be reimbursed for the 2 separate programs?

That decision would fall on the Consortia’s grant manager.

If a coordinator is paid from both a Perkins grant and a Community College's funds, can they just use the semi-annual certification form if it is all for one objective?

As long as 100% of their time could be paid out of either grant. If not, they would need to complete a time log documenting their work specific to each grant.

Can a clerical person’s time spent on administration of the grant be funded through Perkins?

Yes, as long as positive time certification records are kept and the amount is under the 5% cap.

Can Perkins funds be used to pay community colleges instructors’ time to develop dual credit courses (curriculum)?

Only if it is to pay for non-contractual time used. It must also be very clear that payment to the community college instructors was payment to “outside consultants” (in other words, not part of their regular contract duties).

Before agreeing to payments, it is advisable to check into whether a community college should be providing assistance on dual enrollment courses as part of their regular program of work.

If a coordinator is paid from both a Perkins grant and District/LEA funds, can they just use the semi-annual certification form if it is all for one objective and if it includes non-Perkins related time, they would need to complete time logs for their Perkins time, correct?

That is correct for both questions.

Can Perkins fund the salary for a full-time CTE position?

Yes, however it needs to be a “new” position and can only support the salary for up to 3 years.  *If the position was previously ½ time and the objective is to increase to full-time, only ½ the salary can be funded for up to 3 years.

Special Populations

If accommodations are needed to increase the access to or success in CTE classes for students who are members of a special population (as identified in Perkins V), can consumable materials or basic tools or instructional aids be purchased with Perkins funds?

Yes, however these approvals would need to be done on a case-by-case basis. Districts would need to clarify the access/success barriers for why the materials are being purchased.

Can Perkins funds be used for the postsecondary tuition of students who are members of a special population (as identified in Perkins V)?

Possibly. Perkins V emphasizes finding strategies to mitigate barriers students who are members of a special population may face in accessing or finding success in CTE programs. These approvals would need to be done on a case-by-case basis. Clarification would be needed that details the specific access barrier, how this approach is part of a broader strategy for reducing inequities in CTE, along with other pertinent information as requested.

If CTE equipment/supplies are to be loaned out for individual student use, what processes should we have in place?

Purchased tools or tool kits would need to be

  • labeled as district property
  • labeled as purchased with Perkins funds
  • only loaned to students for the duration of the course and
  • returned to the district

Can Perkins pay for registration and costs of attending a conference that centers on Special Needs students or general education improvement?

No. Perkins can only pay for the expenses of CTE teachers centered directly on CTE activities. The conference would need to be a CTE-based conference.

If a salaried position is for a Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker program, or a Single Parent Student Services Specialist, or a Disability and/or a Support Services Counselor, can Perkins funds be used to support these positions?

Yes, if these positions are only providing direct services to CTE Students who are considered members of a special population and who are enrolled in CTE courses during the semester for which they receive services (they would have been reported in the year-end reporting as either a CTE participant or concentrator)? Documentation would need to be submitted to show how these activities lead students to earning a credential/certificate/degree in an H3 occupational area. Also, remember that Perkins funds can only be used for salaries to support staff for up to 3 years.

Unusual Purchases

A Lithium-ion starter kit is described as being important to the revision of woods courses to make them more in line with local career tracks and provide students with training and experiences relevant to local careers. Is this item allowable?

Yes, it is allowable only IF it is a first-time purchase.

Are ergonomic and/or state-of-the-art tools and tool kits allowable expenditures?

Yes, they are allowable; however, they should be a part of an innovative program that combines rigorous academic instruction with career education. However, they cannot be consumable.

Are drill-bits and saw blades considered “consumable”?

Yes, they are consumable. Also, tools such as pliers are considered basic tools and not “innovative” so would not be an allowable expenditure.

Markers, glue, shears, file folders, thank-you notes, and printer ink or toner are examples of consumables and not allowable expenditures.

Can Perkins funds be used for student clothing or uniforms?

No. This would be a direct benefit to the student. This includes clothing specific to a lab such as welding or culinary. This clothing is considered consumable. The same rule applies to gloves, etc.

Would LEGO Mindstorms Education Core Sets be allowable? These are designed for teaching robotics, STEM, critical thinking and collaboration/communication skills.

Yes, it is allowable IF it is used in a CTE Program of Study.

Are Real Care Infant Simulators (Baby Think It Over) an allowable purchase for a consortium to provide for check out? (The babies have been the one item most frequently check out and utilized by FCS and health teachers in our consortium.)

They are allowable with the following stipulation for each school to use them:

They are not allowable for a teen parents program. The use of the requested materials must directly relate to the current standards and Programs of Study. If the requested items were going to be used as part of FACS Program of Study course (e.g. Child Development course in Early Childhood Education and Services) then they would be allowable. The teacher(s) that would be using the materials must attend the $150 (approximately) training offered by the manufacturer to teach using best practices for the materials.

Can Perkins funds be used to pay for a retractable harness for construction technology? These are required per OSHA.

Yes, this is an approvable item to spend Perkins funds as the harness is mandatory for roof repairs and is industry grade.

Can Connecting the Dots: A Career Exploration Day, be paid for with Perkins Funds?

If this is a career exploration activity for middle-school to 9th graders. A team of Extension Educators plan and implement the day’s workshops and activities so this would be an approvable use of funds.

Work-based Learning

Work-based Learning Endorsement

For the Work-based Learning endorsement, 1000 hours of work history evidence must be provided. The work history does not have to be within a specific career cluster as these individuals may be expected to coordinate multiple students in WBL experiences across all areas. Teaching experience cannot count towards the hours required for the WBL endorsement.
(This  ensures that teachers have the technical knowledge and experience in the content area to be able to teach the content.)

Not to be confused with Work-based Experiences endorsement which requires 1000 verified related work hours in a specific career field or 300 hours of supervised work experience under the supervision of a university (student teaching or a practicum).

GMS Error Messages

Warning: Page has Expired: As a security precaution and to preserve the integrity of your data in this system this page has been expired.

If a session was idle for 30 minutes or more, the session may have timed out.

After closing the browser window, do not reselect the grant application link. If you do you will receive another error (Severity Level 1).
You need to Sign Out of GMS and then re-login to continue working.

My Review Checklist Tab will not open.

I get a message stating:  Application has been submitted and that nothing can be added.

Answer: It’s probably due to Pop Up Blockers. Go to your Internet Browser’s settings and be sure to have Pop Up Blocker turned “Off”.  The review checklist is treated as a pop-up by several internet browsers.

Warning: Page has Expired: As a security precaution and to preserve the integrity of your data in this system this page has been expired.

If a session was idle for 30 minutes or more, the session may have timed out.

After closing the browser window, do not reselect the grant application link. If you do you will receive another error (Severity Level 1).
You need to Sign Out of GMS and then re-login to continue working.

Function Code has been selected on more than one row.

(Under the Budget Detail Tab)

When adjusting a Goal’s dollar amount under a Function Code, do not repeat a Function Code with the same topic.
You may need to “Delete Row” and “Add” a new row with the expenditures in order to save the changes.

ERROR-Claim for Reimbursement: "Data not saved. Actual Expenditures YTD for Perkins 6700: object code *** since the budgeted amount was not set, YTD amounts are not allowed. not allowed.

If a budget amount has been set at $0.00, no amounts can be added in the Actual Expenditures column. An amendment may be required in order to move expenditures between object codes before claiming reimbursement.

I submitted my application to my district administrator, but realized I need to make a change. Can the Help Desk unlock the application for my changes?

No. When the application is submitted to the District Administrator, the DA has two choices under the “Submit” tab; 1: approve, or 2: disapprove. Disapproval will return the application back to the data entry user. The data entry user can now make changes and resubmit.

Updated June 18, 2020 4:53pm