I Am A Parent / Guardian / Family Member

Future Ready Community Partnerships

2017-11-22T11:55:13+00:00

Community Partnerships Gear

 

1 Tagline which describes the focus of work in this area

Cultivates Community Partnerships

 

 

Cultivates Community Partnerships

OUTCOME: Cultivates partnerships within the school and local community (families and caregivers, non-profit organizations, government agencies, public and higher education libraries, businesses, etc.) to promote engagement and a lifelong learning process.

Sample Strategies for Future Ready Librarians:

~Plan and host a digital literacy night for community and parents
~Collaborate and create partnership with art department to showcase student artwork.
~Present at a school board meeting
~Social media sharing

 

 

Future Ready Community Partnerships 2017-11-22T11:55:13+00:00

Future Ready Community Partnerships Gear

2017-11-16T11:55:47+00:00

Future Ready Community Partnerships GearPrimary Objective: Establish a Future Ready coalition of interested and invested organizations and parties.

Focus Areas:
   
 ~ Identify and partner with business, community, professional and parent accociations and regional education associations to support Future Ready efforts.

     ~ Engage with higher education institutions to create a K – 16 vision for future readiness to support workforce-readiness efforts.

 


The Future Ready Nebraska Council has developed several goals to guide the work of this gear in Nebraska. These goals are listed below and will be further developed in the Nebraska Digital Learning and Ed. Tech. Plan which is currently under development.

  1. Develop a presentation to be used at professional conferences, webinars, and local planning events which will assist school administrative teams in getting started.  Each committee member will present locally and at least one conference or webinar.

  2. Develop a template and specific guidelines to assist schools in forming a local community partnership committee with an initial mandate to identify local existing partnerships and define areas of need for future partnerships based on the goals of the FRNC, AQuESTT, and current SIP efforts.

  3. Create a process for identifying and describing examples of existing successful school-community partnerships across the state, to be used as a resource for such local committees.

  4. Develop an easily accessible “clearinghouse” of such resources which is searchable and includes categories, descriptions, and contact information.

  5. Support creation of robust partnerships with our student, parent, business, and city communities to advance our vision of developing future-ready students.

Future Ready Community Partnerships Gear 2017-11-16T11:55:47+00:00

Future Ready Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment

2017-11-22T11:57:23+00:00

Curriculum Instruction And Assessment Gear

3 Taglines which describe focus of work in this area

Builds Instructional Partnerships

Empowers Students as Creators

Curates Digital Resources and Tools

 

Builds Instructional Partnerships

OUTCOME: Partners with educators to design and implement evidence-based curricula and assessments that integrate elements of deeper learning, critical thinking, information literacy, digital citizenship, creativity, innovation and the active use of technology.

Sample Strategies for Future Ready Librarians:

~Collaborative Skypes with classes/libraries in other schools
~Plan with teachers ways to integrate technology and information literacy skills into course units
~Design Digital Citizenship lessons with teachers
~Meet with teams of teachers to plan lessons/units matched to maker spaces in library


Empowers Students as Creators

OUTCOME: Encourages and facilitates students to become increasingly self-directed as they create digital products of their learning that engage them in critical thinking, collaboration and authentic, real-world problem solving.

Sample Strategies for Future Ready Librarians:

~Developing a more focused maker program around curriculum standards
~Integrate STE(A)M activities, inquiry, and public displays of learning with any/all content areas.
~Student created book trailers/other digital book promotions.
~Create Video Booktalks or Digital Portfolios with upper level students


Curates Digital Resources and Tools

OUTCOME: Leads in the selection, integration, organization, and sharing of digital resources and tools to support transformational teaching and learning and develop the digital curation skills of others.

Sample Strategies for Future Ready Librarians:

~Create/maintain Symbaloos of resources on topics such as coding, making, digital citizenship, etc.
~Create a blog with curated resources
~Build a collection of Virtual Field Trips
~Create a YouTube channel with different playlists for Students, Teachers and Parents.

 

 

 

Future Ready Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment 2017-11-22T11:57:23+00:00

Future Ready Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Gear

2017-11-16T11:55:53+00:00

Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment GearPrimary Objective: Integrate the effective use of technology in all state academic standards, not just technology standards.

Focus Areas:
     ~ Articulate the expectation that meeting the state standards requires the appropriate use of technology.
     ~ Demonstrate the effective use of technology to support specific standards through exemplars and resources.
     ~ Provide guidance on finding and/or developing high quality digital content.

 


The Future Ready Nebraska Council has developed several goals to guide the work of this gear in Nebraska. These goals are listed below and will be further developed in the Nebraska Digital Learning and Ed. Tech. plan which is currently under development.

  1. Review and Revise the language of Rule 10. Update to include language for 21st Century Learners & Instruction

  2. Provide opportunities for professional personalized educator learning and development using a statewide, coordinated, and collaborative reservoir of resources and find, define and share exemplars of digital teaching and learning.

  3. Integrate the effective use of technology in all state academic standards, not just technology standards.

  4. Create a system of equitable opportunities for access to online resources for all students in NE

  5. Districts are able to leverage technology and diverse learning resources to personalize the learning experience for each student.

  6. Expand teacher recommended & state investments in statewide digital content and learning resources.

  7. All students have access to qualified integration specialists who have the capacity to partner with classroom teachers to design and implement evidence-based curricula and assessments that integrate elements of deeper learning, critical thinking, information literacy, digital citizenship, creativity, innovation, and the active use of technology.

Future Ready Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Gear 2017-11-16T11:55:53+00:00

Future Ready Data & Privacy Gear

2017-11-16T11:55:57+00:00

Data and Privacy GearPrimary Objectives: Provide useful and meaningful data to leaders and educators to support instruction and decisionmaking.  Articulate clear expectations relating to the privacy of student data.

Focus areas:
     ~ Align state data systems to reduce redundancy, streamline data collection and facilitate analysis and use of data.
     ~ Make data a two-way street; provide meaningful data back to districts in user-friendly reports.
     ~ Communicate the state’s policy for its use of student data.
     ~ Ensure all stakeholders – districts, educators, parents and vendors – understand all applicable laws and regulations related to student data privacy.

 


The Future Ready Nebraska Council has developed several goals to guide the work of this gear in Nebraska. These goals are listed below and will be further developed in the Nebrsaka Digital Learning and Ed. Tech. plan which is currently under development.

  1. Adopt and sustain policies protecting privacy and security of student data and ensuring compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

  2. Collect and provide data in efficient and meaningful ways to support instruction and decision-making and minimize the reporting burden of school districts.

  3. Provide resources, communication and training to inform and equip stakeholders to keep student data private and secure.

Future Ready Data & Privacy Gear 2017-11-16T11:55:57+00:00

Future Ready Data and Privacy

2017-11-16T11:56:37+00:00

Data and Privacy Gear

 

1 Tagline which describes the focus of work in this area

Advocates for Student Privacy

 

 

Advocates for Student Privacy

OUTCOME: Teaches and promotes student data privacy through their instruction and role as educational leaders.

Sample Strategies

~Parent training on privacy, digital citizenship and online safety
~Regular lessons on digital citizenship, to be embedded everywhere, and not just a specific month 
~Teach students how to create strong passwords that they can also remember.
~Model digital citizenship in other collaborations and lessons and encourage its use

 

 

Future Ready Data and Privacy 2017-11-16T11:56:37+00:00

Future Ready Personalized Professional Development

2017-11-01T19:05:53+00:00

Personalized Professional Development Gear

 

1 Tagline which describes the focus of work in this area

Facilitates Professional Learning

 

 

Facilitates Professional Learning

OUTCOME: Leads professional learning to cultivate broader understanding of the skills that comprise success in a digital age (e.g., critical thinking, information literacy, digital citizenship, technology competencies, etc.)

Sample Strategies

~Teach professional development courses for the district, present at conferences
~Hold parent sessions to help familiarize them with the devices their students are using
~Begin “You are not alone” campaign for GAFE implementation.
~Serve on a planning committee, seek opportunity to present at an upcoming event

 

 

Future Ready Personalized Professional Development 2017-11-01T19:05:53+00:00

Future Ready Personalized Professional Development Gear

2017-11-16T11:56:04+00:00

Personalized Professional Development GearPrimary Objective: Provide Opportunities for educators and leaders to deepen their Future Ready knowledge.

Focus Areas:
     ~ Identify and partner with business, community, professional and parent associations, and regional education associations to support Future Ready efforts.
     ~ Engage with higher education institutions to create a K – 16 vision for future readiness to support workforse-readiness efforts.

 


The Future Ready Nebraska Council has developed several goals to guide the work of this gear in Nebraska. These goals are listed below and will be further developed in the Nebraska Digital Learning and Ed. Tech. plan which is currently under development.

  1. Teachers will have access to online resources to assist in providing quality instruction to students through use of an online repository of content containing videos, articles and Professional Development opportunities.

  2.  A systematic coordinated approach to professional learning priorities will be developed to support professional learning efforts and initiatives in the state.

  3. Utilize Future Ready resources to support professional learning, planning and prioritizing at school districts including the following targeted staff, Librarians, Ed Tech Leaders, Principals and other School leaders.

Future Ready Personalized Professional Development Gear 2017-11-16T11:56:04+00:00

Future Ready Robust Infrastructure

2017-11-22T11:56:20+00:00

Robust Infrastructure Gear

 

1 Tagline which describes the focus of the work in this area

Ensures Equitable Digital Access

 

 

Ensures Equitable Digital Access

OUTCOME: Provides and advocates for equitable access to connectivity, digital devices, information, resources, programming, and services in support of the district’s strategic vision.

Sample Strategies for Future Ready Librarians

~Promoting the use of Open Educational Resources among students and staff
~COW for library in order to simultaneously serve classes and walk-ins for more access.
~Employ Mobile Hotspots and make available to staff for field trips or other outside of school use
~Flex Media Center hours for more availability to students & parents

 

 

Future Ready Robust Infrastructure 2017-11-22T11:56:20+00:00

Future Ready Robust Infrastructure Gear

2017-11-16T11:56:07+00:00

Robust Infrastructure GearPrimary Objective: Establish a technology ecosystem to ensure every school exceeds industry-connectivity standards.

Focus areas:
     ~ Identify and make available resources to provide every school with access to high speed, high capacity internet.
     ~ Collaborate with local and regional organizations to insure every district and school has the IT capacity needed to support their infrastructure.

 


The Future Ready Nebraska Council has developed several goals to guide the work of this gear in Nebraska.  These goals are listed below and will be further developed in the Nebraska Digital Learning and Ed. Tech, plan which is currently under development.

  1. All students will have access to Internet resources during non-school hours to achieve equity of access.

  2. All Districts will be connected to a statewide single sign-on system, with access to associated resources.

  3. Robust Infrastructure Gear Team will encourage 100% of public school districts to leverage Category 2 E-rate funding to upgrade their internal networking and Wi-Fi.

  4. The State of Nebraska and University of Nebraska will procure and contract for up to six segments of 10Gbps wave services for a northeast Nebraska backbone fiber loop.

  5. Digital learning is adequately funded and fully integrated across multiple budget areas, including instruction, building facilities, technology, staffing, utilities, etc., where appropriate.

Future Ready Robust Infrastructure Gear 2017-11-16T11:56:07+00:00

Future Ready Use of Space and Time

2017-11-22T11:58:04+00:00

Use of Space and Time Gear

 

1 Tagline which describes the focus of work in this area

Designs Collaborative Spaces

 

 

Designs Collaborative Spaces

OUTCOME: Provides flexible spaces that promote inquiry, creativity, collaboration and community.

Sample Strategies for Future Ready Librarians

~Reevaluate Makerspace design areas
~Replace old bookcases with shorter, mobile bookcases
~Purchase flexible seating options (floor chairs, exercise balls, bean bag chairs)
~Add new signage to all areas of library to help students more easily locate information
~Create a functional classroom area and presentation center for co-teaching

 

 

Future Ready Use of Space and Time 2017-11-22T11:58:04+00:00

Health Education

2017-09-28T14:38:49+00:00

**Physical Education Standards Adopted 10/7/2016**

Health Education is a unique and separate academic discipline. It influences individual, family, and societal development, knowledge, attitudes and behavior and seeks the improvement of individual, family and community health. Health education helps individuals seek that which moves them toward optimal stages of wellness. It means also to aid individuals and families in overcoming the debilitating effects of economic deprivation, the lack of balance, disease and accidents of life.

Mission of Health Education

The mission of health education is to motivate young people to maintain and improve their health, prevent disease, and avoid or reduce health-related risk behaviors. It is the role of the health educator to provide young people with the knowledge and skills they need to be healthy for a lifetime and to utilize these health enhancing skills as a means for achieving life’s goals.

The National Health Education Standards states:

  • Standard 1: Students will comprehend concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention to enhance health.
  • Standard 2: Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology and other factors on health behaviors.
  • Standard 3: Students will demonstrate the ability to access valid information and products and services to enhance health.
  • Standard 4: Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance and avoid or reduce health risks.
  • Standard 5: Students will demonstrate the ability to use decision-making skills to enhance health.
  • Standard 6: Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal-setting skills to enhance health.
  • Standard 7: Students will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors and avoid or reduce health risks.
  • Standard 8: Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal, family and community health.

    American Cancer Society

    Our Team

Julane Hill
Coordinated School Health Career Field Specialist
Nebraska Department of Education
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
Ph: 402-471-4352 Fax: 402-471-4565
E-Mail: julane.hill@nebraska.gov

Patsy Shald
Administrative Assistant
Nebraska Department of Education
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
Ph: 402-471-2109 Fax: 402-471-4565
E-Mail: patsy.shald@nebraska.gov

 

Health Education 2017-09-28T14:38:49+00:00

Health Science

2017-11-17T14:46:32+00:00

Career Pathways and Specialty Examples

Health Informatics

Workers occupy many different levels of health care related employment. This pathway includes health care administrators who manage health care agencies as well as those individuals who are responsible for managing all of the patient data and information, financial information, and computer applications related to health care processes and procedures.

Admitting Clerk
Applied Researcher
Cancer Registrar
Certified Compliance Technician
Clinical Account Manager
Clinical Account Technician
Clinical Coder
Clinical Data Miner
Clinical Data Management Specialist
Clinical Data Specialist
Community Services Specialists
Data Quality Manager
Decision Support Analyst
Epidemiologist
Ethicist
Health Educator
Health Information Administrator
Health Information Technician
Health Information Services
Healthcare Administrator
Healthcare Finance Professional
Information Privacy Officer
Information Security Officer
Managed Care Contract Analyst
Medical Assistant
Medical Illustrator
Medical Information Technologist
Medical Librarian
Patient Account Manager
Patient Account Technician
Patient Advocates
Patient Information Coordinator
Project Manager
Quality Management Specialist
Quality Data Analyst
Reimbursement Specialist
Risk Management
Transcriptionist
Unit Coordinator
Utilization Manager
Utilization Review Manager

For a printable list from the National Consortium for Health Science Education, click here:
Health Science Career Specialties Chart.

UNMC’s Careers in Health Care booklet. Although this was published in 2010, this booklet may still have relevant information for students today.

 

 

Health Science 2017-11-17T14:46:32+00:00

High Ability Learners

2017-11-21T14:51:53+00:00

The Latest News

HAL Bulletin Announcement

High Ability Learners (HAL) Eligible
Contact: Becky Keilig (402-471-0737 or becky.keilig@nebraska.gov)
The timeframe for editing “High Ability Learners Eligible” student data (field 129) in the 2016-2017 Student template is coming up on June 14, 2017, so now is the time to make sure your HAL students are correctly identified in NSSRS. Please visit (or have the Data Steward at your district) NSSRS Validations and verify the Student Verification reports: General and Miscellaneous – High Ability Learner Eligible.

Contact the help desk if you have any questions.

How to contact the NDE Helpdesk
There are three ways to contact the NDE Helpdesk with questions. All three ways get to the same place, so please only use one of these options.

  1. Submit a “Helpdesk Request” from your portal account. After logging into the NDE Portal, it is available in the upper right corner of the Collection Announcement page. This will be the fastest way to get your request to the NDE Helpdesk.
  2. Email: nde.helpdesk@nebraska.gov
  3. Call Toll Free: 888-285-0556 – Please leave your full name, organization, call back number, and a brief description of your question.

Please see below for the 2016-17 school year HAL reporting

2016-2017 High Ability Learners (HAL)

Contact: Becky Keilig(402-471-0737 or becky.keilig@nebraska.gov)

For the 2016-17 school year, all High Ability Learners (HAL) reporting must once again be submitted through the NDE Portal under the “Data Collection Tab”. This application is due to NDE no later than September 1, 2017.

The HAL student count is coming from NSSRS, and if you do not think the count is accurate, you will need to update your data in the NSSRS Student Template. The pre-populated items and editing window is described below and included in the instructions on the online collection. Pre-populated values on the Base and Matching Funds application:

  • Count of HAL eligible students from NSSRS – Students are identified as High Ability Learner Eligible in NSSRS in the Student Template. A ‘High Ability Learner Eligible’ student list is available on the NSSRS Validations website under Verification Reports/Student/General and Miscellaneous. Any changes made to HAL Eligible students in the NSSRS Student Template will be available in the HAL application the next day.
  • Ten percent (10%) of October Snapshot Count from NSSRS – Membership is the K-12 student count pulled from NSSRS with changes due to Unifications and Dissolutions. A ‘Membership by Grade, Race and Gender’ report is available on the NSSRS Validations website under Verification Reports/Student/Membership and Attendance. Make sure to only count K-12, and make changes for Dissolutions and Unifications.

Districts will be able to make changes to their HAL Eligible students during the two windows for editing the NSSRS Student Template: August 1-10 and the window opens up again on August 23rd. Any changes made to HAL Eligible students in the NSSRS Student Template will be available in the HAL application the next day.

High Ability Learners 2017-11-21T14:51:53+00:00

HIV AIDS Education

2017-09-25T00:38:16+00:00

Welcome to the HIV/AIDS Education
& Prevention Homepage

Healthy Youth Nebraska: Addressing Risks, Resiliency & Barriers to Success Conference Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017 Holiday Inn in Kearney

HIV/AIDS Prevention Program Overview

HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.  AIDS stands for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.   It is the result of the HIV infection.  Very simply, it is a disease caused by a virus that can damage the brain and destroy the body’s ability to fight off illness.  AIDS by itself doesn’t kill.  But it allows other infections (such as pneumonia, cancer and other illnesses) to invade the body, and these diseases can kill.

NDE also coordinates the administration of statewide surveys the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) the Youth Tobacco Survey (YTS) and the Nebraska Risk and Protective Factor Student Survey.   Student Health and Risk Prevention (SHARP) is the umbrella uniting the ONLY three student health surveys endorsed by the Nebraska Department of Education (NDE) and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS).  The SHARP data provides insight into the health behaviors of our youth.

The Latest News!!

The “Sunny D’s” HIV Peer Educators has received the 2012 Governor’s Points of Light Award

HIV Study Named Breakthrough of 2011

In January 2012, Science, the nation’s leading science journal, named a study with Nebraska ties the 2011 breakthrough of the year.  Researchers say the findings have changed the discussion about stemming the spread of HIV.  

Susan Swindells, medical director of the HIV Clinic at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, co-authored the study, which examined transmission rates in 1,750 couples, each with one infected partner.  The study showed that the use of antiretroviral drugs by partners with HIV/AIDS stopped the spread of the disease to their uninfected partners 96 percent of the time.

“In theory, we could treat our way out of this epidemic,” Swindells said.  “We’ve got something that works.”  The medications could be used to quarantine the virus in those already infected, which could lead to its complete eradication, she said.  But the costs of the drug plus the lack of access to it by more than half of the 40 million people infected with HIV worldwide are major obstacles, Swindells said.

In the United States, antiretroviral cost about $14,400 a year for each HIV-infected person.  That doesn’t include the cost of health care or monitoring.  The therapy’s effectiveness already has shifted the conversation about AIDS, a debate that long has been complicated by those who fear that treatment could detract from prevention efforts.
The study, lead by HIV Prevention Trials Network, has led some world leaders, including Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, to emphasize treatments as prevention.  The HIV Prevention Trails Network, a global partnership dedicated to reducing the transmission of HIV, led the study.

Groundbreaking National Sexuality Education Standards Set the New Gold Standard for Sexuality Education in Public Schools

Four leading health organizations recently released the first-ever national standards for sexuality education in schools.  Published in the Journal of School Health, the ground-breaking National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12 provide clear, consistent, and straightforward guidance on the essential minimum, core content for sexuality education that is developmentally and age-appropriate for students in grades Kindergarten through grade 12.
The standards are the result of a cooperative effort by the American Association of Health Education, the American School Health Association, the national Education Association Health Information network, and the Society of State Leaders of Health and Physical Education, in coordination with the Future of Sex Education (FoSE) Initiative.  Nearly 40 stakeholders including content experts, medical and public health professionals, teachers, sexuality educators, and young people developed the standards in a two-year process. 
To view the complete National Sexuality Education Standards, go to http://www.shapeamerica.org/standards/

AIDS at 30: The U.S. Epidemic

“AIDS at 30: The U.S. Epidemic” chronicles the thirty years since the first cases of a rare pneumonia found in young gay men were reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. This four minute video highlights landmarks in the history of AIDS from the discovery of the AIDS virus and the banning of Ryan White from attending school to the early twenty-first century when the CDC recommends HIV testing for virtually every American.
http://www.kff.org/hivaids/062111vid.cfm

Our Team

Chris Junker,
Safe and Healthy Schools Career Field Specialist
Head Start Building
123 N. Marian Rd.
Hastings, NE 68901
PHONE: 402-462-4187 ext 166
FAX: 402-460-4773
E-MAIL: chris.junker@nebraska.gov

Patsy Shald,
Administrative Assistant
Health/Physical Education
Nebraska Department of Education
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509-4987
PHONE: 402-471-2109
FAX: 402-471-4565
E-MAIL: patsy.shald@nebraska.gov

 

HIV AIDS Education 2017-09-25T00:38:16+00:00

Mathematics Education

2017-09-27T21:06:59+00:00

Welcome to NDE Mathematics Home Page

Mathematics Standards

NEBRASKA’S COLLEGE AND CAREER READY STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS
Adopted by the State Board of Education on September 4, 2015

2015 Mathematics Standards (vertical) (pdf)

2015 Mathematics Standards (horizontal) (pdf)

 

Nebraska’s standards organized with three levels of specificity:

K-12 Comprehensive Statements – Identify broad, general statements that are not grade level specific and cover big ideas in mathematics. (Number, Algebra, Geometry, and Data)
Grade Level Expectations – Statements that identify what students should know and be able to do by the end of each identified grade/band. These are organized into categories, but not course specific.
Curricular Indicators – Specific information to distinguish expectations between grade levels. They are no longer simply examples but are considered an integral part of the standard to be taught.

A few highlights are:

• Mathematical processes, located at the front of the document, were identified to enhance proficiency across all standards at any grade level.
• The four broad strands (Number, Algebra, Geometry, and Data) remain the same.
• Grades K-5 have an even stronger focus on building a solid foundation of number sense.
• The standards were streamlined by removing the duplication from grade to grade.
• The high school grade band has changed to Grades 9-11 and “Advanced Topics” appear at Grade 12. All students are expected to master the K-11 standards, and the NeSA Math assessment is given at the end of 11th grade.  Many colleges and universities require four years of high school mathematics for admission, and some of the content reflected in the Advanced Topics (Grade 12) standards may be recommended for particular majors in postsecondary education.  Therefore, students entering postsecondary education are encouraged to take additional math courses that will help them become college and career ready through the Advanced Topic standards.  

Nebraska has historically been a local control state with no mandated curriculum or textbooks. The standards are not meant to be a curriculum. Rather, districts are expected to align their local curriculum to the Nebraska Standards to add more specificity. Nebraska’s draft standards are written using verbiage that describes the knowledge and skills students are expected to master at the various grade levels rather than using performance expectation language. Districts also have the choice to adopt their own standards only if they are more rigorous than the state standards.
The numbering system is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Math Standards – Approved by the State Board, October 8, 2009

Do Math: Family Math Webinar 

Take a closer look at the Family Math book available from your 21st CCLC afterschool program library. Experience activities from the resource using everyday materials. Several models of hosting a family math event were shared. Learn how to get the entire family involved in doing math together.
Materials needed: Paper clip, pencil or pen, print copy of handouts.
Family Math
Do Math

McREL Alignment Study for Mathematics

Report Executive Summary of the McREL Alignment Study for Mathematics
Click Here

Comparison of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics to the Nebraska Mathematics Standards
Grades K-12 Click Here

Comparison of the Nebraska Mathematics Standards to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics Grades K-12 Click Here

Mathematics Education 2017-09-27T21:06:59+00:00

Migrant Education Program

2017-11-17T14:48:53+00:00

About the Nebraska Migrant Education Program (MEP)

The Nebraska Migrant Education Program (MEP) has been working to ensure that migrant children fully benefit from the same free public education provided to other children. To achieve this, the MEP supports educational programs for migrant children to help reduce the educational disruptions and other problems that result from repeated moves.

An Overview of the Nebraska Migrant Education Program

New Resources

2017-2018 Title I Part C Migrant Education Program Suballocations (posted 9.12.2017)

State Profile 2017-18 (posted 5.15.2017)

Continuous Improvement Cycle Overview 12-9-16 (pdf)

MEP Profile Booklet (posted 12.29.2016)

MEP Profile Booklet – Spanish (posted 1.19.2017)

Who We Are/Who We Serve – English (posted 5.15.2017)

Who We Are/ Who We Serve – Spanish (posted 11.13.2017)

Newsletters and Articles

Nebraska MEP Newsletter Feb. 2014 Edition

Health Survey from UNMC

Proteus March 2015 Newsletter

 

Nebraska Department of Education | Migrant Education Program | 301 Centennial Mall South – PO Box 94987 | Lincoln, NE 68509

 

Migrant Education Program 2017-11-17T14:48:53+00:00

Multicultural/Diversity Education

2017-09-19T15:21:54+00:00

Power of the Role Models: interactive, downloadable–updated May 2016

Standards

NDE standards has incorporated multicultural education. Visit the weblink to review by content area.

Standards Webpage

 

Power of the Role Models

Interactive website displaying Native American’s from Nebraska and their occupations.

https://sites.google.com/a/education.ne.gov/power-of-role-models/

 

 

Multicultural/Diversity Education 2017-09-19T15:21:54+00:00

National Assessment of Educational Progress

2017-09-01T19:19:15+00:00

What is NAEP?

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as “the Nation’s Report Card,” is designed to measure what students across the nation know and can do in ten subject areas, including mathematics, reading, writing, and science. The results of these tests are reported in the Nation’s Report Card. There are two essential components of NAEP; Main, and Long-term Trend.

Main NAEP provides useful information about student academic achievement at the national and state level. State level results allow us to learn more about student achievement in Nebraska, while also allowing for comparisons between our state and the nation.

Long-Term Trend NAEP, administered every four years, is designed around math and reading content frameworks that have remained virtually unchanged since the early 1970’s. This stability in frameworks is essential to Long-Term Trend NAEP as it provides policy makers with information about student learning over time.

Why Is NAEP Important?

Established by Congress in 1969, NAEP was created to provide a common national yardstick for accurately evaluating the performance of American students.

Who takes NAEP?

Each year a sample of students is drawn to represent the entire student population in grades four and eight.  NAEP assessments are administered to this sample of students, rather than the entire population. This sampling greatly reduces the cost of testing and significantly reduces the burden placed on school staff, while still providing highly reliable results.

Each year since 1992, anywhere from 24 to 350 schools in Nebraska have participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

Test scores are always kept confidential.   Performance on NAEP is never reported for individual students, schools, or districts.

What NAEP assessments were given in Nebraska in 2014?

In spring 2014 NAEP administered national assessments in technology and engineerling literacy at grades 4 and 8 to a sample of Nebraska students.

Must schools participate in NAEP?

Yes. Federal law requires that states and districts receiving Title I funding participate in the State NAEP reading and mathematics assessments in grades 4 and 8 every two years.

 

 

National Assessment of Educational Progress 2017-09-01T19:19:15+00:00

NDE Legislative Corner

2017-09-25T19:15:17+00:00

In an effort to keep others informed on important legislation impacting education in our state, the Communications and Outreach team has developed the NDE Legislative Corner. The Nebraska Unicameral is typically in session January through April.

NDE Legislative Corner March 24, 2017

NDE Legislative Corner March 10, 2017

NDE Legislative Corner February 8, 2017

NDE Legislative Corner January 25, 2017

NDE Legislative Corner January 19, 2017

 

Contact:

David Jespersen
Public Information Officer
david.jespersen@nebraska.gov

NDE Legislative Corner 2017-09-25T19:15:17+00:00

Nebraska Career & Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs)

2017-09-22T19:56:47+00:00

 

 The Center for Student Leadership
 

CTSO Professional Development Opportunities

DECA

DECA

DECA
DECA is organized around an ambitious goal: to improve education and career opportunities for students interested in careers in marketing, management and entrepreneurship.

FBLA

FBLA

FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America)
Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) provides innovative leadership and career development programs for students interested in business administration, management, finance and information technology careers.

FCCLA

FCCLA

FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders of America)
Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) is a national student organization that helps young men and women become leaders; address personal, family, work and societal issues through Family and Consumer Sciences Education. 

Educators Rising

Educarors Rising website

Educators Rising
Educators Rising is an organization that helps make sure teachers have the experience and skills they need to be ready for the classroom. Starting with high school students, we provide passionate young people with hands-on teaching experience, sustain their interest in the profession, and help them cultivate the skills they need to be successful educators. The result is a pipeline of accomplished teachers who are positioned to make a lasting difference — not only in the lives of their students, but also in the field of teaching more broadly.

FFA

FFA

FFA
FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

HOSA

HOSA

HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America)
HOSA is a national student organization that prepares health science students for careers as health professionals by developing leadership, compassion, character, and well being.

SkillsUSA

SkillsUSA

SkillsUSA
SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together
to ensure America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA helps each student excel.

Schools with Career Student Organizations

Specialty Support Programs

Integrated throughout the six career fields.

Data + Research + Analytics
Entrepreneurship
Nontraditional and Special Populations
School Counseling and Career Guidance
Work-Based Learning

Nebraska Career & Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) 2017-09-22T19:56:47+00:00

Nebraska Career Education

2017-11-01T15:03:26+00:00

Nebraska Career Education is a system that:

  • Emphasizes career development through career awareness, exploration and preparation
  • Offers world-class secondary Career Technical Education Programs of Study that provide seamless transition to post-secondary education
  • Promotes expanded learning opportunities for students through components such as Workplace Experiences and Career and Technical Student Organizations
  • Supports professional development for school counselors, teachers and administrators
  • Fosters essential partnerships that link CTE in schools and colleges with business and industry, workforce, economic development and government agencies

Nebraska Career Education 2017-11-01T15:03:26+00:00

Nebraska eBooks

2017-11-17T13:58:20+00:00

Welcome to the Nebraska eBooks Project!

The NeBooks Project is a partnership between schools, state agencies and non-profit organizations across Nebraska for the common purpose of providing quality instructional materials. The initial focus of this project was creating Nebraska focused eBooks for use in meeting 4th grade Nebraska History standards. As the project has continued to grow and gain momentum, we want to encourage the writing of eBooks in all content areas to be added to our eBook Library.

If you would like to participate in the Nebraska eBooks program please download the file with guidelines for the project below. If you have further questions please feel free to contact me via email at dorann.avey@nebraska.gov and I would be happy to help you further.

NeBooksGuidelines

Nebraska eBooks 2017-11-17T13:58:20+00:00
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