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Apple recipes that will please the kids

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Apple recipes that will please the kids

BAKED APPLES 
  • 6 firm medium apples (about 2 lbs)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves

Core the apples and place them in a baking dish. Fill the centers with a mixture of the brown sugar and raisins. Sprinkle the apples with a mixture of the spices. Cover the bottom of the dish with water. Bake at 350 degrees for about one hour or until tender. Serve while warm.

Alternate fillings: bananas, marshmallows, jelly, nuts or berries.

Makes 12 1/4 cup servings (1/2 apple) 

   

 

STUFFED APPLES 
  • 1 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup crispy rice cereal
  • 1/2 cup shredded carrots
  • 6 medium apples (about 2 lbs)

Mix the first three ingredients. Core the apples. Fill the apples with the mixture. Chill for 20 minutes. Slice and serve.

Makes 12 1/4 cup servings (1/2 apple) 

Apple Adventures

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Apple adventures

Taste Test:

Purchase as many kinds of apples as your budget allows. Put them out in a big bowl early in the day so the children can see them and get excited about the afternoon “Apple Adventure.”

Allow them to feel the shiny skin, to wash and polish them, compare colors and smells and choose the one each thinks will taste the best to them.

Have several staff help the children remove peels, forming long curls. Let them sample the skin; ask them what they notice about it and talk it over. A child might say something to suggest discussion about the fiber it providers, or how apple juice is made, or how many there are, etc.

As the children tire of exploring, move on to tasting. A plastic knife or wheel-shaped apple slicer/corer will allow the children to help produce samples of each variety. Children can try them with and without the skin and see how much flavor is right next to the skin (as is most of the vitamins).

Provide vanilla yogurt with a sprinkling of cinnamon and some barely warm peanut butter for dipping. Now you have a creditable snack with fruit and meat components. Add some water for drinking and for washing up afterwards.

More Fun With Apples!

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

More fun with apples!

Here are some suggestions for activities with apples.

Read books about apples.

Visit an orchard and let children pick their own apples.

Watch Johnny Appleseed, collect apple seeds, act like Johnny and plant some seeds indoors or outdoors and see if they grow.

Bob for apples in water or try to get a bite from apples hanging from the ceiling on strings tied to their stem.

Ask parents for favorite apple recipes. Include them on your menu as “Erin’s Apple Cake” etc.

Make a simple cookbook from the apple recipes.

Collect apple pictures, photograph the activities and let the children make a large collage for the parents to see.

Meal Pattern Requirements for Children Ages 1-12

FOOD CHART

AGE 1-2 YEARS3-5 YEARS6-12 YEARS
BREAKFAST
Fluid Milk1/2 cup3/4 cup1 cup
Juice or fruit or vegetable1/4 cup1/2 cup1/2 cup
Grains/Breads1/2 slice*
(or 1/2 serving)
1/2 slice*
(or 1/2 serving)
1 slice*
(or 1 serving)
or cold dry cereal1/4 cup
(or 1/3 oz.)
1/3 cup
(or 1/2 oz.)
3/4 cup
(or 1 oz.)
or cooked cereal1/4 cup1/4 cup1/2 cup
SNACK select two different components from the following four components **
Fluid Milk1/2 cup1/2 cup1 cup
Juice or fruit or vegetable1/2 cup1/2 cup3/4 cup
Meat or meat alternate1/2 ounce1/2 ounce1 ounce
or yogurt2 oz
(or 1/4 cup)
2 oz
(or 1/4 cup)
4 oz
(or 1/2 cup)
or peanut or other seed or nut butters1 T1 T2 T
or egg (large)1/21/21
Grains/Breads1/2 slice*
(or 1/2 serving)
1/2 slice*
(or 1/2 serving)
1 slice*
(or 1 serving)
LUNCH/SUPPER
Fluid milk1/2 cup3/4 cup1 cup
Meat or poultry or fish 1 ounce 1 1/2 ounce 2 ounces 
or cheese1 ounce1 1/2 ounce2 ounces
or cottage cheese, cheese food, or cheese spread2 ounces
(1/4 cup)
3 ounces
(3/8 cup)
4 ounces
(1/2 cup)
or egg1/23/41
or cooked dry beans or peas1/4 cup3/8 cup1/2 cup
or peanut butter, soynut butter or nut or seed butters2 T3 T4 T
or peanuts, soynuts, tree nuts or seeds1/2 oz. = 50%3/4 oz. = 50%1 oz. = 50%
or yogurt4 oz.
(or 1/2 cup)
6 oz.
(or 3/4 cup)
8 oz.
(or 1 cup)
or an equivalent quantity of any combination of the above meat/meat alternative   
Vegetables and/or Fruits (2 or More)1/4 cup (total)1/2 cup (total)3/4 cup (total)
Grains/Breads1/2 slice*
(or 1/2 serving)
1/2 slice*
(or 1/2 serving)
1 slice*
(or 1 serving)

POINTS TO REMEMBER  

  • Keep menu production records
  • The required amount of each food must be served
  • Use full-strength (100%) juice
* or an equivalent serving of an acceptable grains/breads such as cornbread, biscuits, rolls, muffins, etc., made of whole grain or enriched meal or flour, or a serving of cooked enriched or whole grain rice or macaroni or other pasta products. Refer to the grains/breads list for correct weights. 

** For snack, juice or yogurt may not be served when milk is served as the only other component.

Infant Meal Pattern

FOOD CHART
Meal Pattern Requirements for Infants

The newly revised infant meal pattern shown here became effective December 15, 1999.

Age

Breakfast

Lunch and Supper

Snack

Birth through 3 months

4-6 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk 2,3

4-6 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2,3

4-6 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2,3

4 months through

7 months

4-8 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2,3

0-3 tablespoons infant cereal1,4

4-8 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2,3

0-3 tablespoons infant cereal1,4

0-3 tablespoons fruit and/or vegetable4

4-6 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk 2,3

8 months up to first birthday

6-8 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2,3

2-4 tablespoons infant cereal1

1-4 tablespoons fruit and/or vegetable

6-8 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2,3

2-4 tablespoons infant cereal1 and/or 1-4 tablespoons meat, fish, poultry, egg yolk, or cooked dry beans or peas or 1/2 – 2 ounces cheese, or 1-4 ounces cottage cheese, cheese food or cheese spread.

1-4 tablespoons fruit and/or vegetable

2-4 fluid ounces formula1, breast milk2,3 or fruit juice5

0 – 1/2 slice bread4,6 or 0-2 crackers4,6

1 Infant formula and dry infant cereal shall be iron-fortified.

2 It is recommended that breast milk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months.

3 For some breastfed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breast milk per feeding, a serving of less than the minimum amount of breast milk may be offered, with additional breast milk if the infant is still hungry.

4 A serving of this component shall be optional.

5 Fruit juice shall be full-strength.

6 Bread and bread alternates shall be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour.

 

Infant feeding Forms

Forms & Resource Center

Infant feeding

Infant Formula – Infant Feeding Selection Form – this is used for parents to accept/decline the formula offered by the child care center and to indicate when the child is developmentally ready for solid foods.  

Infant Production Records

Two sets of standardized infant production records are available (3 records per set, based on the age of the infant).

You may select the set that works best in your child care center .

Set One: Weekly Meal Records – Five days of meals may be recorded for an individual infant.

Set Two: Daily Meal Records – Meals served to four infants may be recorded for a full day

More information and resources about feeding infants

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