Mentorships

Definition

Mentorships are career exploration activities in which the student is matched with an adult professional in a chosen field of interest to explore careers, postsecondary education options, industry expectations, and career readiness skills. The career mentor serves as a resource by sharing insights and providing guidance about the workplace, careers and education.  The mentors can help the student understand the required education for a given career as well as any requirements such as licenses, certifications, registrations or educational degrees.

Students benefit from regular contact with a knowledgeable and supportive adult mentor outside of the classroom and school environment. A mentor may visit the classroom, conduct interviews, and provide information related to the needs of the business or organization.  The student may also visit the workplace and gain better understanding of the career in which the mentor is engaged and the related job duties and responsibilities. Career mentoring is a formal, long-term supportive relationship between a student and an individual more senior in age and experience with similar career interests.

The mentor serves as a good role model, but does not serve as a counselor for the student. Student with personal issues should be referred to the school counselor. Career mentoring can occur as a face-to-face activity or as an e-mentoring activity.

The mentoring relationship generally begins after the student has entered the ninth grade and has established a tentative career interest area. Mentors and students interact one-on-one as a mentor assists a student in developing a career plan to integrate knowledge, skills and abilities the student will need to achieve career goals. The mentor offers support, guidance, motivation and concrete assistance as the student enters new areas of career exploration and takes on important tasks to further career aspirations.

Purpose/Objective: Career Exploration

Students benefit from regular contact with a knowledgeable and supportive adult mentor outside of the classroom and school environment. These experiences are uniquely designed to enhance CTE course content experiences and observations with the mentor.

Benefits

  • Promotes exploration of a career area of interest for the student.
  • Allows students to gain realistic perspectives on expectations in a job and or career area and the workplace requirements from an adult role model.
  • Provides the flexibility to educate beyond traditional time, location and method constraints.
  • Unites education and business to best meet career interests of an individual student.
  • Increases self-confidence, self-worth, self-knowledge, interpersonal skills and knowledge in a career area.
  • Supplements information that can be obtained through other work awareness and work exploration strategies.
  • Provides an opportunity to develop students’ career readiness skills, including communicating effectively and appropriately (speaking, professional etiquette), personal responsibility, etc.
  • Provides information on the industry, types of careers and occupations, knowledge and skills requirements and work processes in the actual work settings.
  • Engages students in thinking intentionally about the importance of career development through conversations with the career mentor.
  • Empowers setting long-term attainable goals.

Success Factors

  • Develop a plan that includes a clear process for selecting prospective participants.
  • Match students with career mentors based on career interest and personality.
  • Develop a process to identify career mentors that demonstrate the ability to:
    • Support the growth, skill and career development efforts of the student.
    • Help the student explore options, values and career alternatives.
    • Convey to the student a sense of caring and importance.
    • Contribute to the student’s feeling of self-worth.
  • Have a procedure in place to check the backgrounds of prospective career mentors.
  • Work with students in the development of a portfolio that describes career interests, experiences, goals and other background information.
  • Develop and provide written career mentorship agreement that includes:
    • Expectations of a mentor and student.
    • Length of the mentorship relationship.
    • Number and location of the mentorship meetings.
    • Description of the mentorship evaluation process.
    • Signatures of mentor, student, parent and school representative.
  • Allow the mentor and student to interview and select each other.
  • Have the student and mentor set and communicate expectations that are assessed on a regular basis.
  • Provide orientation activities for the participant and mentor prior to the beginning of the mentorship.
  • Ensure participants are supervised by the local educational agency/institution.
  • Develop an application and interview process for prospective students to provide a means for the instructor to meet and clarify mentorship goals.
  • Require a mentorship training to prepare the student for the activity.
  • Require students to keep a journal to record and reflect on discussions they had with their mentor. Journals may be graded as a part of the workplace experience program.
  • Provide time for weekly meetings with classmates and instructors to share experiences and ensure student follow-through.
  • Send thank-you notes to business and agencies for allowing their employees to participate in the program. Recognize individuals who volunteer as mentors.
  • Contact local media to promote activities and to recognize businesses and agencies that participate.

Key Legal, Safety and Health Issues

  • Mentoring should focus on career exploration, training and related education
  • Mentoring should take place at the school, workplace or an approved outing.
  • Mentors that participate in activities with students outside the workplace should be approved by the school administration and parents. A mentoring permission form should be used when setting up the mentoring relationship.

Prerequisites

Prior to placement in a mentorship experience each LEA shall ensure that a Mentorship Training Agreement is secured. Parent signature on training agreement is required in order to participate in mentoring experience.

Student Participation/Qualifications

Students participating in Job Shadowing must be enrolled in career and technical education and seek a mentor in a career area of interest.

Credits Earned

Credit may be awarded through regular classroom and laboratory grading.

 

MENTORSHIP FORMS

Student Application for Mentoring

Student Application for Mentoring

Mentor Questionnaire

Mentor Questionnaire

Teacher Evaluation for Mentoring Form

Teacher Evaluation for Mentoring Form

Student Mentoring Evaluation Form

Student Mentoring Evaluation Form

Mentor Evaluation Form

Mentor Evaluation Form

Job Shadowing

Definition

Job shadowing is a structured component of the Career and Technical Education (CTE) curriculum that provides a supervised observational experience in an approved business/industry setting.   Job Shadowing experiences are integrated within specific CTE courses that allow the student to observe technical skills learned in the classroom. This experience is directly supervised by the CTE teacher.

Purpose/Objective: Career Exploration

Job Shadowing provides an opportunity for students in grades 8–12 to gain knowledge by observing previously learned theory in CTE courses. These experiences are uniquely designed to meet course content standards through supervised experiences and observations, which are coupled with related classroom instruction.

Success Factors

  • Develop a plan that includes a career process for selecting potential job shadowing participants andsites for quality job shadowing/work experiences
  • Develop a process to identify employees at a business or organization who are willing to be shadowed and demonstrate the ability to:
    • Support the growth and career development efforts of the participant
    • Help participants explore career options and job opportunities
    • Convey a sense of caring and importance
    • Enhance the student’s feeling of self-worth
  • Develop a process for matching student’s interests with related careers, businesses, and industries
  • Encourage parental input
  • Provide a clear understanding to the job shadowing site and mentor (in writing) that explains how the student will be prepared and what is expected from the site and the mentor
  • Provide safety instruction for all job shadowing/work experiences, especially where there may be a physical risk
  • Ensure that job shadowing/work experience participants are supervised by the school and a school employee is assigned to that duty
  • Conduct orientations for the student and the job shadowing mentor(s)
  • Prior to the job shadow, have the student research the occupation, develop questions, and establish learning objectives and goals
  • Arrange for students to have exposure to all aspects of industry
  • Identify the education or training required and the skills needed for various occupations
  • Provide reflection opportunities after the job shadow such as journals to record and reflect on the shadowing experience
  • Accommodate students of all abilities
  • Review job shadowing activities periodically and adjust accordingly

 

Benefits

  • Designed to promote:
    • Exploration of a field of interest
    • Exposure to careers and jobs
    • Awareness of the academic, technical and career readiness skills required in particular jobs
  • Provide an exposure to careers and jobs in the actual work setting
  • Expands student learning beyond the walls of the classroom into the local community
  • Provide students with experiences and perspectives that are not possible to duplicate in the classroom
  • Allow students to gain realistic perspectives on expectations in a job and/or career field and the workplace requirements
  • Supplement information that can be obtained through other work awareness and work exploration strategies
  • Provide an opportunity to develop students’ career readiness skills, including communicating effectively and appropriately (speaking, professional etiquette), personal responsibility, etc.
  • Provides information on the industry, types of careers and occupations, knowledge and skills requirements and work processes in the actual work setting
  • Students learn the importance of thinking about career development through conversations with the job shadowing mentor

Key Legal, Safety and Health Issues

  • Job shadowing/work experiences are usually considered to be similar to field trips. School district policies regarding transportation and liability apply
  • Relevant company safety and health rules should be reviewed with students
  • Students participating in job shadowing activities can participate in mock situations, shadow employees or even participate in the operations of the workplace as long as the person typically responsible for the duty is observing the students’ actions (US DOL Fact Sheet No. 013, Employment Relationship Under the Fair Labor Standards Act)

Prerequisites

Prior to placement in a shadowing experience each LEA shall ensure that a Job Shadowing Training Agreement is secured. Parent signature on training agreement is required in order to participate in shadowing experience.

Student Participation/Qualifications

Students participating in Job Shadowing must:

  • Be enrolled in grades 8-12.
  • Be physically and mentally capable of observing and maintaining attention while shadowing.
  • Be in good academic standing and have an acceptable discipline record as determined by the CTE Teacher.

Roles and Responsibilities

Job Shadowing requires time, commitment, and collaboration of the following partners:

  • Students must arrive at the business/industry at the appropriate time and in the appropriate dress.  Students must comply with the rules and regulations of the school district, school, and training facility. 
  • Parents/Guardians should provide ongoing support to the student and assume the responsibility for the conduct of the students. 
  • CTE teachers shall identify the business industry and placement of students based on their area of interest.

Credits Earned

Credit is earned for the specific CTE course for which the student is enrolled.

Workplace Supervisors Role

It is important for the supervisor to understand that job shadowing students are not present to work. They are there to observe and ask questions.

Upon agreeing to take a job shadowing student, the supervisor will:

  • Be responsible as the single point of contact for daily contact and planning
  • Meet with the students at the start and end of each job shadow day
  • Arrange for the actual job shadowing experience(s)
  • Inform the student of any relevant polities or regulations at the worksite
  • Answer any relevant questions about the profession or facility
  • Direct students to the area of their career interest
  • Connect the student with professionals that support their area of interest
  • Monitor the student and contact the district supervisor should there be any problems
  • Complete the Workplace Supervisor’s Job Shadow Feedback Sheet upon completion

Student Expectations

As part of the job shadowing experience, students will:

  • Make phone contact with the job shadow contact 5-10 business days before the experience begins
    • Verify: dress code, safety requirements, meeting location and meeting procedures
  • Dress according to the standards of the particular site
  • Call the site before the scheduled time if unable to attend on the appointed day
  • Call the school district contact before the scheduled time if unable to attend on the appointed day
  • Arrive at the site at the agreed upon time
  • Provide the job site with an up-to-date resume
  • Follow all guidelines and policies of the site
  • Complete any school assignments related to the job shadow experience
  • Complete all required paperwork (permission, medical authorizations, etc.)
  • Send the business a thank you letter within 0-5 business days of the job shadow

List of required assignments for the job shadow:

  • Written report on a specific career
  • Information about the job shadow site: media and photos of work areas and projects *verify photos are allowed
  • Summary of employee interviews
  • A journal entry describing each day’s activities
  • Classroom oral presentation and multimedia on careers represented at the job shadowing site

Teacher’s Role

The classroom teacher will be responsible to see that all students participating in the job shadowing experience have met all of the criteria required prior to the placement of students on the job shadowing sites and assess the job shadow assignments.

  • Collecting appropriate information from the students
  • Contact information
  • Job shadow preferences
  • Biographies
  • Parent contact information
  • Parent permission slips
  • Waivers specific to the job shadow site
  • Student resumes
  • Thank you letters drafts
  • Arrange presentations of job shadows
  • Assess student’s documentation and presentations
  • Review supervisor feedback

District Supervisor’s Role (Teacher Coordinator)

The District Supervisor (Teacher Coordinator) will be responsible to see that all students participating in the job shadowing experience have met all of the criteria required prior to the placement of students on the job shadowing sites.

 The coordinator’s responsibilities and duties include:

  • Arrange Job Shadow week, student business alignment and record keeping
  • Follow-up with the worksites for feedback on the job shadow
  • Monitoring completion of student assignments
  • Being available in emergency situations
 

JOB SHADOW FORMS

 
Job Shadow Registration Form

Job Shadow Registration Form

Job Shadow Observation Worksheet

Job Shadow Observation Worksheet

Job Shadow Example Questions

Job Shadow Example Questions

Workplace Supervisor's Job Shadow Feedback Sheet

Workplace Supervisor’s Job Shadow Feedback Sheet

Job Shadow and Presentation Evaluation Form

Job Shadow and Presentation Evaluation Form

Job Shadow Reflection Form

Job Shadow Reflection Form

Job Shadowing Training Agreement

Job Shadowing Training Agreement

Business Tours & Field Trips

Definition

A business tour/fieldtrip is an excursion or planned work-based learning experience for a group of students allowing them to explore or observe occupations.  These experiences should be carefully planned to provide a quality educational experience, protect the safety of the students and create positive relationships with the business.  This experience must be supervised by a Career and Technical Education (CTE) certified teacher or school counselor.

Purpose/Objective

The purpose of business tour/Fieldtrip is to provide students with an informative introduction to careers in various businesses.

Benefits

  • Permit the flexibility of arranging the business tour/field trip for one student, a small group of students or an entire class
  • Provide an exposure to careers and jobs in the actual work setting
  • Expands student learning beyond the walls of the classroom into the local community
  • Provide students with experiences and perspectives that are not possible to duplicate in the classroom
  • Allows students to gainrealistic perspectives on expectations in a job and/or career field and the workplace requirements
  • Supplements information that can be obtained through other work awareness and work exploration strategies
  • Allow more informal, personal interaction and conversation between the business tour/field trip guide than traditional classroom presentations
  • Provide an opportunity to develop students’ career readiness skills, including communicating effectively and appropriately (speaking, professional etiquette), personal responsibility, etc.
  • Provides information on the industry, types of careers and occupations, knowledge and skills requirements and work processes in the actual work setting
  • Students learn the importance of thinking about career development through the career path stories their tour guides share

Success Factors

  • Reach out to diverse local employers and professionals that align to students interests
  • Choose business tours/field trips that allow students exposure to all aspects of the industry
  • Review examples of the business/industry’s marketing materials, products, or services performed in advance of the visit
  • Prepare students for the work environment (guidelines, restrictions, safety requirements, etc.)
  • Have students generate a list of questions, prior to the visit to ask the guide(s) during the visit
  • Identify the education or training required and the skills needed for the occupations found at the business/organization
  • Clearly communicate expectations/guidelines and your understanding of what the business tour/field trip will involve to the business guide(s)
  • Ask the business/employer to build in demonstrations during the tour to explain why the company has been successful
  • Request that guides allow time for employees to explain their roles, responsibilities, and how they were educated, trained or qualified to be employed at the worksite
  • Provide reflection opportunities after the business tour/field trip
  • Encourage business tour/field trip guides to have tangible take-aways such as brochures, handouts, business cards, etc.
  • Clearly communicate the objectives of the business tour/field trip to the guide(s) AND to the students participating
  • Have students identify and discuss the career readiness skills observed
  • Require students to write reflections and/or thank you letters following the worksite visit
  • Recognize business partners, publicly, for their involvement (e.g., thank you letters, awards, newspaper articles, framed certificate)
 

Key Legal, Safety and Health Issues

  • Relevant company safety and health rules should be reviewed with students
  • School district policies regarding transportation and liability apply
  • Students and teachers participating in business tours/field trips should receive relevant safety instruction and gear (e.g., eye goggles, hard hat, gloves, etc.)

Prerequisites & Related Instruction

None

Student Selection/Qualifications

Student selection for participation in business tours/fieldtrips is to be determined by the Local Education Agency (LEA).  Students in grades 7-12 can benefit from this experience.

Roles and Responsibilities

The student is responsible for demonstrating a business-like attitude and appropriate conduct.

Credits Earned

Credit is not awarded for this work-based learning experience.

Supervision/Coordination Requirements    

Adequate supervision as required by the (LEA) to participate in the experience.  

Required Documentation & Forms   

Each student should submit forms required for participation by the LEA

Insurance Coverage

Each student participating in the experience should be covered by personal insurance or group coverage offered by the school or activity sponsor, if applicable.

Videos

Overview

Career videos show the types of work in which individuals employed in a career field, cluster or pathway are engaged. Nebraska Career Education, in cooperation with the Nebraska Departments of Labor and Economic Development, offers an array of virtual career tours of Nebraska-based businesses and industries.  Discussion guides for the teacher and viewing guides for students have been developed for each career tour.  These virtual industry tours provide a unique opportunity to get a glimpse inside Nebraska-based industries without leaving the classroom.  Interviews, tours of the business environment and “pop-up” information and statistics on job markets, salaries, and educational requirements are part of each career cluster’s videos. The videos are free and accessible at Nebraska Career Tours

CareerOneStop Videos, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, offer a large video collection that allows students to learn about careers, industries, skills and abilities, or work options and education levels.  The Career and Cluster videos show the work that people do in nearly 550 careers, organized by the 16 career clusters.  The Skill and Ability videos explore the skills and abilities employers are looking for in job candidates.  Work option videos focus on non-traditional careers and work options.  The videos can be accessed HERE.

Benefits

  • Provide a supplement to information that can be obtained through other work awareness strategies such as curriculum, career fairs, guest speakers, etc.
  • Students explore a career field or pathway in which they have an interest
  • Enable a large number of students to explore a variety of career opportunities efficiently
  • Provide the opportunity to gain an understanding of all aspects of an industry

Success Factors

  • Identify videos that are current, short in length and include a broad range of demographics (age, gender, ethnicity, etc.)
  • Clearly communicate the objectives of viewing the career video(s) to the students
  • Provide a student viewing guide with key questions or information for students to watch for while viewing the video (salary, educational requirements, job description, occupational outlook, personal characteristics, skills and knowledge needed, career readiness skills needed, advantages/ disadvantages/rewards/challenges)
  • Guide students to think about the importance of the particular career or job by posing an anticipatory set of questions
  • Develop a set of questions related to the video to pose to the class for discussion or written communications activities
  • Have students list career readiness skills referenced or demonstrated in the career video and explain the importance of each skill to success in that career

Speakers

Overview

Career Speakers are career awareness activities that provide opportunities for students to learn about the skills required in various industries or career fields; the career paths taken by those in the field; the tools, materials and equipment used; and the work environment and expectations for performance in various industries.

Benefits

  • Provide an opportunity for a classroom or group of students to hear directly from a business person or career professional.
  • Allows students to gain realistic perspectives on expectations in a job and/or career field and the workplace requirements
  • Supplements information that can be obtained through other work awareness strategies.
  • Students explore a career field or pathway in which they have an interest.
  • Enable a large number of students to explore a variety of career opportunities efficiently.
  • Provide the opportunity to gain an understanding of all aspects of an industry.

Success Factors

  • Reach out to diverse local employers and professionals that align to student interests.
  • Consider a panel of 2-3 guest speakers rather than a single presenter to offer more depth and breadth of information and alleviate some of the pressure on a single presenter to fill a specified period of time.
  • Request that the speaker:
    • Describe a typical work day.
    • Describe their occupation, educational requirements and specialized training required.
    • Discuss the aspect of their jobs they like best/least.
    • Discuss future employment outlook and projections for their career area.
    • Share the general wage and salary information.
    • Discuss benefits provided by the company/organization in which they are employed.
  • Suggest that the guest speaker include hands-on activities for the students.
  • Obtain a brief bio of the guest speaker in advance of the presentation to share with the class.
  • Clearly communicate the objectives of having the guest speaker present to the class.
  • Guide students to think about the importance of the particular career or job by posing an anticipatory set of questions.
  • Have students list or discuss the career readiness skills referenced in the guest speaker’s presentation.
  • Allow time for a brief question and answer period.

Research Projects

Overview

Career Research Projects engage students in researching the educational requirements, required skills, salary ranges, job duties, types of work and benefits as well as challenges associated with a particular career field, cluster or pathway. Quality career research projects involve online research, personal interviews with individuals employed in that career, written presentation/reflection and oral presentation of the findings. 

Benefits

  • Students explore a career field or pathway in which they have an interest
  • Enable a large number of students to explore a variety of career opportunities efficiently
  • Allow students to practice the career readiness skills of communicating effectively and appropriately through speaking, writing, and professional etiquette
  • Offers the opportunity to use a variety of research methods including internet research, library research, job shadowing, personal interviews, etc.
  • Engage students critical thinking and decision making as they meet with various career professionals and learn more about the responsibilities and rewards of each career field or pathway they represent

Success Factors

  • Clearly communicate the objectives and expectations for the career research project
  • Provide a sample worksheet with key questions that should be answered in the research (Salary, educational requirements, job description, occupational outlook, personal characteristics, skills and knowledge needed, career readiness skills needed, advantages/disadvantages/rewards/challenges
  • Incorporate interviews into the research to allow practices of verbal and written communication skills
  • Require an information presentation of the information and perspectives gained from the career research project
  • Provide a clear grading criteria/rubric to guide the career research project activities and specify outcomes

Career Fairs

Overview

Career fairs are career awareness opportunities for larger groups of students that may be organized by schools and employers to introduce students to opportunities within an industry or in multiple industries.

Benefits

  • Enable a large number of students to explore a variety of career opportunities efficiently (in a concentrated period of time in a single location)
  • Allow students to practice the career readiness skills of communicating effectively and appropriately through speaking, writing, and professional etiquette
  • Provide the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of all aspects of their industries
  • Engage students critical thinking and decision making as they meet with various career professionals and learn more about the responsibilities and rewards of each career field or pathway they represent
  • Encourage networking by making connections with potential employers and mentors
  • Inform students of a range of job and career opportunities available in the community and area
  • Provide the opportunity for students to learn about work-based learning opportunities such as internships
  • Build partnerships with the business community and get prospective business partners involved in the efforts of career and technical education teachers and school counselors
 

Success Factors

  • Design career fairs with the specific target audience age ranges in mind.
  • Start preparing early, allowing the advance lead time necessary (5-6 months minimum recommended) for working out the logistics of the event (date, times, location, invitation list, etc.)
    • Avoid holidays, test dates, high stress times
    • Gain participation from as many other teachers/administrators as possible
  • Enlist a career day planning team to organize and carry out major tasks.
  • Compile a database of local employers (businesses, non-profit organizations, government agencies)
  • Invite twice as many presenters as you think you will need.
  • Cover all six Career Fields found on the Nebraska Career Education Model (Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources; Business, Marketing, and Management; Communication and Information Systems; Human Sciences and Education; Health Sciences; Skilled and Technical Sciences)
  • Intentionally focus on all post-high school career options (certificate programs, apprenticeships, specialized training programs, 2-year postsecondary, 4-year postsecondary, military service)
  • Provide specific, detailed information to career fair presenters on how to maximize the benefit to the participating students by sharing:
    • How and why they chose their career field/profession
    • Training and/or education necessary
    • Career readiness skills essential to their success
  • Provide classroom preparation for the career fair experience
  • Develop a master schedule
  • Have students conduct preparatory research on companies that will be represented at the career fair
  • Organize a welcome session to greet career fair presenters/speakers
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on what they learned during the career fair interactions
  • Send thank-you notes or letters to all career fair presenters
  • Have students practice appropriate follow-up communication skills by writing thank-you notes or letters to all career fair presenters and volunteers

Adapted from the following sources:

10 Tips for Career Day Success, ASCA School Counselor, November 1, 2010

Host a Career Day, Envision Blog, October 13, 2015

How to Plan a School Career Day

Career Related Education Manual, revised 2012, Georgia Department of Education, July 2012

Career-Based Service Learning

Overview

Career-Based Service Learning combines traditional community service with a structured school- and work-based opportunity to explore a career field, emphasizing the connections between the service experiences, preparation for careers (career readiness skill development) and academic learning.  Students benefit by acquiring career-related skills and knowledge while learning civic responsibility and gaining personal satisfaction. Service learning can be embedded in short-term projects and can be individual, team or classroom oriented.  

Benefits

  • Students apply content knowledge they have learned in school, critical thinking and good judgment to address genuine community needs
  • Engages students in experiential, hands-on projects in the community while deepening their understanding of an area of career interest
  • Informs the students career and postsecondary education planning
  • Develops skills, habits and attitudes vital to career success
  • Helps students understand the needs of their local business and non-profit organizations and agencies
  • Provides the context in which students can gain organizational, team, problem-solving and critical thinking skills, along with attitudes and capabilities necessary to succeed in work and life
Teacher Checklist for Service Learning Development

Teacher Checklist for Service Learning Development

Service Learning Project Planning Worksheet

Service Learning Project Planning Worksheet

Success Factors

  • Allow students to design and select the career-based service learning activity
  • Provide classroom preparation for the career-based service learning
  • Have students conduct preparatory research and report on the community/business/non-profit organization need
  • Students complete a planned series of activities and apply their skills and knowledge to help meet a need in the school or greater community
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on their learning and contribution to the business, non-profit organization or agency.

Supervised Agricultural Experience

Definition

Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) is a work-based learning opportunity that allows students with a career objective in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (AFNR) to gain experience and apply what is learned in the classroom, laboratory or training site to real-life situations. The experience is supervised by an AFNR teacher including those holding level and specialty area certificates.

Purpose/Objective: Career Exploration/Application

The objective of the SAE is to provide students the opportunity to gain experience in agricultural fields for which they have a career interest and objective.

Related Instruction

Students must be enrolled in an AFNR course related to the student’s career objective. All students enrolled in an AFNR course are required to participate in SAE.

Roles and Responsibilities

SAEs require time, commitment, and collaboration of the following partners:

  • Students are responsible for maintaining their SAE record book. 
  • Parents/Guardians provide ongoing support to the student.  Parents must provide transportation to the SAE site if applicable.
  • AFNR Teachers provide ongoing supervision to the student and integrate the student’s worksite experience with learning at school.
  • Business/community partners may provide opportunities for students SAEs.
National Council for Agricultural Education's SAE Philosophy and Guiding Principles

National Council for Agricultural Education’s SAE Philosophy and Guiding Principles

Appropriate Placement

SAEs must relate to the student’s career objective and adhere to all federal and state labor laws. 

Credits Earned

Credit may be awarded through AFNR courses.

Supervision/Coordination Requirements

Close supervision is necessary for successful implementation of a SAE.  AFNR teachers are responsible for the educational progress of their students.           

Placement Restrictions or Limitations

Students may not work in any hazardous occupation as defined by state and federal labor laws. 

Required Documentation and Forms

SAE records must be completed and on file with the AFNR teacher for each student.

Nebraska Approval Process for Work-Based Learning Strategy Programs

Nebraska school districts conducting programs at the work-based learning strategy level, must meet the following minimum components:

  • A teacher with appropriate certification including the work-based learning endorsement to serve as the work-based learning coordinator.
  • Instruction is provided by the school district in the technical skill area the student wiII be experiencing in the work-based learning program.
  • The student-learner works intermittent, short periods of time under the direct and close supervision  of the coordinator.
  •  Assurance to adhere to Fair Labor Standards Act
  • Safety instructions are provided by the school and correlated by the employer with on-the-job-training.
  • A schedule of organized and progressive work processes to be performed on the job is prepared.
  • Employer agrees to provide training, supervision and adherence to safety protocol.
  • Written evaluation of student performance provided by employer and coordinator.
  • Pay must be at the minimum wage or training rate wage. Additional requirements are in place for training rate wage.
  • Signatures of student, parent, teacher coordinator and employer.

Programs meeting the minimum components allows the student learners to work in those hazardous occupations where exceptions are allowed for student-learners.

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