Career Planning & Management

Nearly all careers require education beyond high school. Knowledge of college options, entrance requirements, application processes and financial aid is vital for students and families to learn. Career planning and management is about identifying goals, then creating an action plan (a Personal Learning Plan) to accomplish those goals.

 

There are two components:

College and Career Options

Every student should graduate from high school plus have the tools and  opportunities to acquire postsecondary education and training appropriate to their career goal.

Personal Learning Plans (PLPs) & Portfolios

Planning is an essential step toward accomplishing any goal.

Career Exploration

Career exploration skills consists of learning how to identify and analyze various career options in terms of what education, training, experience and competencies are required for success. Exploration includes learning in workplace environments or directly in workplaces to discover what it may be like to work in different occupations. It also involves learning how to evaluate how well a career matches or fits one’s own interests, skills, strengths and work values.

 

There are three components:

Nebraska Career Education

Nebraska Career Education (NCE) teaches individuals to turn their passion, talent and abilities into successful careers and fulfilling lives

Labor Market Information

Career choices should consider talents and passions; however, the economy determines income and job openings.  It is a high-risk decision to select and prepare for occupations with low projected career opportunities.  Be mindful of labor market information.

Workplace Experiences

Learning in a workplace is one of the best ways to determine if a career choice is a good fit.

Self Awareness

Self-awareness skills refer to individuals gaining the ability to identify their interests, skills and work values. Self-awareness includes understanding one’s own mastery level of career readiness (employability) skills. The Nebraska Career Readiness Standards are essential for all types of careers. This enhanced self-awareness paves the way to effectively explore careers and identify personal career goals with the best fit.

Nebraska Career Readiness Standards

Nebraska Career Readiness Standards are employability skills required by business and industry.  Every person needs these transferable skills to be successful at school, at work and in life.

Career and Academic Assessments

Career and academic assessments identify strengths from a variety of perspectives to find careers that are the best-fit.

NE Career Development Model

Career Development

 

The process by which individuals get tto know their strengths and interests; learn how different jobs connect with those interests; explore careers in current labor markets; and build career planning and management skills to achieve career goals.1

The Nebraska Career Development model consists of three skill domains with component parts:

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness skills refer to individuals gaining the ability to identify their interests, skills and work values. Self-awareness includes understanding one’s own mastery level of career readiness (employability) skills. The Nebraska Career Readiness Standards are essential for all types of careers. This enhanced self-awareness paves the way to effectively explore careers and identify personal career goals with the best fit.


Components

  • Nebraska Career Readiness Standards
  • Career and Academic Assessment

Career Exploration

Career exploration skills consists of learning how to identify and analyze various career options in terms of what education, training, experience and competencies are required for success. Exploration includes learning in workplace environments or directly in workplaces to discover what it may be like to work in different occupations. It also involves learning how to evaluate how well a career matches or fits one’s own interests, skills, strengths and work values.


Components

  • Nebraska Career Education
  • Labor Market Information
  • Workplace Experiences

Career Planning and Management

Nearly all careers require education beyond high school. Knowledge of college options, entrance requirements, application processes and financial aid is vital for students and families to learn. Career planning and management is about identifying goals, then creating an action plan (a Personal Learning Plan) to accomplish those goals.

 


Components

  • College and Career Options
  • Personal Learning Plans & Portfolios

Welcome to the Nebraska Career Development Toolkit

We believe all individuals should be empowered to choose a meaningful career and education pathway to position themselves for lifelong success.

Career development programs provide instruction and learning experiences to improve career decision-making for all students.  This toolkit includes information and resources for Nebraska career development programs.

Components of the Nebraska Career Development Toolkit

Background information on how career development can increase student college and career readiness.

 

Learn More

This section is a collection of information and  considerations in planning effective career development programs.

 

Learn More

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness skills refer to individuals gaining the ability to identify their interests, skills and work values.

Career Exploration

Career exploration skills consists of learning how to identify and analyze various career options in terms of what education, training, experience and competencies are required for success.

Career Planning and Management

Knowledge of college options, entrance requirements, application processes and financial aid is vital for students and families to learn.

Career Development Model

(mouse over each domain to learn more)

Families are always influential in career decisions and this information outlines how to keep families involved and informed.

 

Learn More

A searchable collection of lesson plans categorized by grade, NE Career Development Model domain/focus, and Nebraska Career Readiness Standards.

 

Learn More

This section encourages the partnerships of schools, programs, agencies and additional stakeholders for the benefit of all students to plan and achieve college and career goals.

Learn More

A listing of all resources mentioned in this toolkit, grouped NE Career Development Model domain/focus.

 

Learn More

Protected: Workplace Experiences For Nebraska

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Postsecondary CTE Data Reporting

Career Education data are collected to support the federal reporting of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act.

There are two primary aspects for reporting postsecondary data that relate to CTE:

  1. The Postsecondary Perkins Students Template: This file collects sets of students that are enrolled in an institution during a certain academic year, and that are relevant to Perkins reporting (including all CTE Participants and Concentrators as defined here). A Postsecondary Enrollment record must be submitted for each student appearing in the Perkins Students template.

  2. The Postsecondary Perkins Courses Template: This file collects the entire course history, though the end of the reporting academic year, for each of the students listed in the Perkins Students file. At a minimum, all courses with an REU Course Weight of 1.5 of 2.0 should be reported. A Perkins Students record must first be submitted for each student appearing in the Perkins Courses file.

*Keep in mind the Postsecondary Enrollment Template as well as the Postsecondary Academic Awards Template must also be submitted by all Postsecondary institutions to avoid a data loading process rejection.

Note:

  • Data submission includes all students who earn credit in at least one Career and Technical Education course.
  • All courses related to occupational training should be weighted at least at a 1.5, per the Nebraska Community College State Aid Enrollment FTE/REU Guidelines document.

Helpful Links:

All data should be submitted via the Postsecondary Data Manager, located within the NDE Portal. A User’s Guide can be found here: Postsecondary Data Manager User Guide. Additional information can be found on the Nebraska P-20 Technical Group’s website

 

Secondary CTE Data Reporting

Career Education data are collected to support the federal reporting of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. All templates, forms, data reporting calendar, and instructions for interfacing with the NSSRS are available on the NSSRS homepage.

The due date for these templates is June 15th. There is an audit window from June 15-June 30th.

Key considerations when reporting: 

  • Data submissions include grades 7-12 in schools that offer career education courses
  • Career education participants are determined during the current program year 
  • Concentrators are determined by evaluating the number of courses in which the student earned credit throughout the 9-12 school experience within a specific career cluster. 
  • Concentrators should be reported when they are in the 12th grade
  • No students can concentrate in the CEFOUND program code

There are three primary aspects for reporting secondary data:

  1. The Student Grades Template: A student template must first be submitted for each student appearing in a Programs Fact template or the data loading process will reject the record. The Student Snapshot template is already required for reporting by every school for every student through the NSSRS system. This template collects information related to the student’s demographics and characteristics.

  2. The Programs Fact Template: Career Education: This template has three primary areas for completion for Career and Technical Education. The basic flow of completing the template requires (1) the identification and coding of what cluster area(s) the student participated and/or concentrated, (2) the identification of the student’s highest level of participation in that cluster area, and (3) if the student is a concentrator, the identification of the Technical Skill Attainment using the coding structure provided. Click here to see the Course to Career Cluster Crosswalk. 

  3. The Post School Survey Template: the Post School Survey is used to provide follow-up information on the concentrators that graduated in the previous year. The information provides the data required to report on the follow-up measure. More information on obtaining follow-up data can be found in the Graduate Follow-Up Approaches and Resources document within the “Resources” section to the left.

Helpful Links:  

CTE Definitions

Below are definitions and descriptions for the most commonly used terms in CTE data and data reporting. 

 

Career Cluster


A career cluster is an organizing structure of career areas with similar skills or common themes based on industry groupings at all educational levels. Sixteen career clusters areas exist within the Nebraska Career Education model.

Career Field


Six broad groupings of 16 different career cluster areas based on commonalities among clusters.

Concentrator


Secondary: A career education concentrator is a student in grades 9-12 who has earned credit in three (3) or more one semester-long courses within a single career cluster.

Postsecondary: A postsecondary student who:

  1. has earned at least 12 academic or CTE semester credits (18 quarter credits) within a single CTE program sequence that is comprised of 12 or more academic and technical semester credits (18 quarter credits) that ultimately results in an award of an industry-recognized credential, a certificate, diploma, or degree; OR

  2. has completed a short-term CTE program sequence of less than 12 semester credits (18 quarter credits) that ultimately results in an industry recognized credential, a certificate, diploma, or degree.

*Note: This does not include non-credit certification programs.

Concentrator with Postsecondary


A secondary career education concentrator who has also completed a course associated with postsecondary education. There are several options, including dual credit, concurrent credit, articulated credit, or some other designation provided through a postsecondary institution.

Participant


Secondary: A career education participant is a student in grades 7-12 who has earned credit in at least one career and technical education course during the school year. Students may participate in more than one career area.

Postsecondary: A postsecondary student who has earned one (1) or more credits in a 1.5 or 2.0 weighted course in any CTE program area.

Participant with Postsecondary


A secondary career education participant who has also completed a course associated with postsecondary education. There are several options, including dual credit, concurrent credit, articulated credit, or some other designation provided through a postsecondary institution.

Perkins Performance Indicators


The Performance Indicator framework was developed by the United States Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE), in cooperation with the United States Department of Labor and stakeholder organizations to achieve two major objectives:  (1) to create a common reference format to discuss the components of Perkins accountability and, (2) to establish performance measurement approaches for the Performance Indicators. Click here to learn more about these indicators, including goals, outcome performance, and measurement approaches. 

Program of Study


A program of study is a sequence of at least three (3) semester-long career education courses in a given career cluster that prepares students for postsecondary education and entry into a career area of personal choice. For more information about Nebraska’s State Model Programs of Study, please visit our Career Education Standards website

Perkins Performance Indicators

The Perkins Performance Indicator framework was developed by the United States Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE), in cooperation with the United States Department of Labor and stakeholder organizations to achieve two major objectives:

  1. To create a common reference format to discuss the components of Perkins accountability, and
  2. To establish performance measurement approaches for the Performance Indicators.

The framework is intended to define state performance measurement approaches for each indicator to ensure sufficient rigor and comparability among state performance accountability systems. Further, the framework is intended to define performance and data collection approaches that can be easily integrated into state and local performance management systems to support continuous program improvement.

Secondary Performance Indicator Descriptions

1S1: Academic Skill Attainment – Reading/Language Arts: The percentage of Career Education students, concentrating in a course of study, who met the on-track or ACT Benchmark level on the NSCAS Summative English Language Arts Assessment.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who have met the on-track or ACT Benchmark level on the statewide high school English/language arts assessment (ACT) administered by the State under Nebraska Law section 79-760.01 and 79-760.03.
  • Denominator:  Number of CTE concentrators who took the statewide high school English/language arts assessment (ACT) administered by the State under Nebraska Law section 79-760.01 and 79-760.03.

1S2: Academic Skill Attainment – Math: The percentage of Career Education students, concentrating in a course of study, who have met the on-track or ACT Benchmark level on the statewide high school mathematics assessment (ACT).

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who met the on-track or ACT Benchmark level on the statewide high school mathematics assessment (ACT) administered by the State under Nebraska Law section 79-760.01 and 79-760.03.
  • Denominator:  Number of CTE concentrators who took the statewide high school mathematics assessment (ACT) administered by the State under Nebraska Law section 79-760.01 and 79-760.03.

2S1: Technical Skill Attainment: Percentage of Career Education students, concentrating in a course of study, who demonstrate technical skill attainment through GPA, dual credit course completion, industry certification, or other approved methodology.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who passed technical skill assessments that are aligned with industry-recognized standards, if available and appropriate, during the reporting year.
  • Denominator:  Number of CTE concentrators who took the assessments during the reporting year.

3S1: Completion: Percentage of Career Education students, concentrating in a course of study, that graduated with a diploma.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who earned a regular secondary school diploma, earned a GED credential as State-recognized equivalent to a regular high school diploma (if offered) or other State-recognized equivalent (including recognized alternative standards for individuals with disabilities), or earned a proficiency credential, certificate, or degree, in conjunction with a secondary school diploma (if offered) during the reporting year.
  • Denominator:  Number of CTE concentrators who left secondary education during the reporting year.

4S1: Graduation Rate: Percentage of Career Education students, concentrating in a course of study, who were included in the graduate rate calculation for adequate yearly progress (AYP) for the state of Nebraska.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who, in the reporting year, were included as graduated in the State’s computation of its graduation rate as described in Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vi) of the ESEA.
  • Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators, who, in the reporting year, were included in the State’s computation of its graduation rate as defined in the State’s Consolidated Accountability Plan pursuant to Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vi) of the ESEA.

5S1: Placement: Percentage of Career Education students, concentrating in a course of study, that graduated and within the 2nd quarter after the year of completion are enrolled in a postsecondary program, advanced training, service to the military, or are employed.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who left secondary education and were placed in postsecondary education or advanced training, in the military service, or employment in the second quarter following the program year in which they left secondary education (i.e., unduplicated placement status for CTE concentrators who graduated by June 30, 2007 would be assessed between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2007).
  • Denominator:  Number of CTE concentrators who left secondary education during the reporting year.

6S1: Nontraditional Participation: The percentage of gender non-traditional students participating in programs leading to occupations that are determined to be gender non-traditional.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE participants from underrepresented gender groups who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year.
  • Denominator: Number of CTE participants who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year.

6S2: Nontraditional Completion: Percentage of gender non-traditional students who complete programs leading to occupations that are determined to be gender non-traditional.

  • Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators from underrepresented gender groups who completed a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year.
  • Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators who completed a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year.

Postsecondary Performance Indicator Descriptions

1P1: Technical Skill Attainment: The percentage of CTE Concentrators who have met technical skill attainment.

  • Numerator: The number of CTE Concentrators who achieved a minimum GPA of 2.0 in CTE program curricula that are aligned with industry-recognized standards during the reporting year.
  • Denominator: The number of CTE Concentrators during the reporting year.

2P1: Credential, Certificate, or Degree : The percentage of CTE Concentrators that graduated with a diploma, degree, certificate, or credential (previous reporting year).

  • Numerator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the previous reporting year who received an industry-recognized credential, certificate, diploma, or degree.
  • Denominator: The number of CTE Concentrators during the reporting year.

3P1: Student Retention or Transfer: The percentage of CTE Concentrators who did not graduate, but remained enrolled in postsecondary education (either in their original postsecondary institution or transferred to another 2- or 4- year institution).

  • Numerator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the previous reporting year who remained enrolled in their original postsecondary institution or transferred to another 2- or 4-year postsecondary institution during the current reporting year.
  • Denominator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the previous reporting year who did not earn an industry recognized credential, certificate, diploma, or degree in the previous reporting year.

4P1: Student Placement: The percentage of CTE Concentrator graduates employed in work, military, or apprenticeships.

  • Numerator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the previous reporting year who were placed or retained in employment, or placed in the military service or apprenticeship programs during the 2nd quarter following the program year in which they left postsecondary education (e.g. unduplicated placement status for CTE Concentrators who graduated by June 30th would be assessed between October 1st and December 31st).
  • Denominator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the previous reporting year who left postsecondary education with a credential, certificate, degree, or diploma during the previous reporting year.

5P1: Nontraditional Participation: The percentage of CTE Participants taking a class that is nontraditional for their gender compared to all students taking a class in an area classified as nontraditional.

  • Numerator: The number of CTE Participants from the current reporting year form underrepresented gender groups who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the current reporting year.
  • Denominator: The number of CTE Participants from the current reporting year who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the current reporting year.

5P2: Nontraditional Completion: The percentage of gender nontraditional Concentrators who graduated.

  • Numerator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the current reporting year from underrepresented gender groups who completed a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the current reporting year.
  • Denominator: The number of CTE Concentrators from the current reporting year who completed a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the current reporting year.

State Goals

The following state and local goals are agreed upon annually with the United States Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education Office (OCTAE).

Secondary:

Performance Indicator2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-2019
1S1: Academic Skill Attainment – Reading/Language Arts70%70%73%74%
1S2: Academic Skill Attainment – Mathematics61%61%63.75%64%
2S1: Technical Skill Attainment86.5%88%90%90.75%
3S1: Completion97%97.74%98%98%
4S1: Graduation Rate98%98.75%98.9%99%
5S1: Placement97%97%97.25%97.5%
6S1: Nontraditional Participation42%42.43%43.62%43.25%
6S2: Nontraditional Completion27%28.75%29%29%

 

Postsecondary

Performance Indicator2015-20162016-20172017-20182018-2019
1P1: Technical Skill Attainment91.5%92% 91.5%92%
2P1: Credential, Certificate, or Degree48%40%41.5%42.25%
3P1: Student Retention or Transfer74%73%75%77%
4P1: Student Placement73%74%71%72.5%
5P1: Nontraditional Participation21.2%24%25%27%
5P2: Nontraditional Completion14%16%16.5%17%