2004

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2004 News Articles

“25% Free/Reduced” is permanent
The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 permanently establishes that for-profit child care centers may participate in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) if at least 25 percent of the children served are eligible for free or reduced price meals. For-profit child care centers may also continue to qualify for CACFP participation if at least 25 percent of enrolled children or 25 percent of licensed capacity (whichever is less) receive title XX compensation.
07/01/2004

Child Care Homes get boost from new law
More family day care homes in Nebraska are expected to be eligible to receive the higher “tier 1” rate of reimbursement under changes in the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004.
07/01/2004

WIC works wonders for Nebraska families
3/24/2004

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2004 2017-08-22T19:04:39+00:00

Child Care Homes get boost from new law

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Child Care Homes get boost from new law

7/01/2004

More family day care homes in Nebraska are expected to be eligible to receive the higher “tier 1” rate of reimbursement under changes in the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004. The bill was signed into law by President Bush on June 30.

Under the law, family day care homes may be eligible for the tier 1 rate of reimbursement if they are located in a school area where 40 percent of the students are eligible for free or reduced price meals. Previously, the eligibility had been set at 50 percent.

This pilot program is aimed at helping people providing child care in rural areas expand their food service. Under this program, the number of school areas eligible for tier 1 rates will increase from 121 to 220, making more family day care home providers eligible for the higher rate of meal reimbursement.

The pilot program will be in effect for Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007, beginning July 1, 2005.

Child Care Homes get boost from new law 2017-08-22T19:08:35+00:00

WIC works wonders for Nebraska families

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

WIC works wonders for Nebraska families

3/24/2004

Pregnant?

Breastfeeding?

Have kids under the age of 5?

Parents and guardians are concerned about providing healthy foods for their families. The Nebraska WIC Program is a supplemental nutrition program providing extra foods for women, infants and children.

WIC can:

  • Provide nutritious foods such as milk, cheese, cereal, eggs and juice to help stretch food dollars

  • Provide ideas for eating right and using WIC foods

  • Make referrals to other health programs and social services

  • Provide nutrition and breastfeeding information, education and counseling

  • Provide immunization screening

Participants must have a nutritional need for WIC foods, based on a health or nutrition risk identified by a WIC nurse or nutritionist, must live in Nebraska, and meet specific income guidelines. Many working people can qualify for WIC. There are currently over 120 WIC clinics in Nebraska.   For more information or to make an appointment, contact the WIC agency nearest you or call the State WIC Office at: 1-800-942-1171

This information was provided by Nebraska Health and Human Services System, Nebraska Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

WIC is an equal opportunity provider.
ADA/EOE/AA

WIC works wonders for Nebraska families 2017-08-22T19:10:19+00:00

2005

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

2005 News Articles

HHS Offers Quality Improvement Grants
Nebraska Health and Human Services has a new grant opportunity available to licensed child care providers. The Quality Improvement Grant is designed to assist licensed home and center based child care providers with items to improve the quality of services provided. There are no restrictions as to the numbers of currently licensed child care facilities in the applicant’s community, however, the funds may only be used by licensed child care homes or centers currently serving low-income families. The maximum grant award is $500, and once funded, applicants may not reapply for additional funding for three years.   Applications are accepted monthly and must be postmarked by the first of the month to be included in that month’s review cycle.   Allowable items include developmentally appropriate toys and equipment, children’s books, outdoor play equipment, and adaptive equipment for children with special needs, but do NOT include wired smoke detectors, fences, property, administrative costs, consumable or disposable items.

For more information on this and other child care grant opportunities available through HHS, contact Diane Lewis, HHS Child Care Grants Manager, P.O. Box 95044, Lincoln, NE   68509, phone (402) 471-9152, or e-mail diane.lewis@hhss.ne.gov .
posted: 11/28/2005

Claims Manual now available

A manual with step by step instructions for filing your claim online is now available.
Claims Manual
posted: 09/16/2005

Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) dates announced for FY 2006
posted: 07/27/2005

Reimbursement Rates for FY 2006 published in Federal Register
posted: 07/18/2005

Clarification on Infant Formulas
USDA has issued a new policy memo, CACFP 756, which provides clarification on questions regarding determining if an infant formula is creditable and the use of special diet statements for infant formulas.
posted: 07/05/2005

Household contact policy for sponsors of more than one site
CACFP regulations now require that every sponsor of more than one child care center participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program in Nebraska must include in its monitoring of centers a system for making household contacts. Read more
posted: 03/29/2005

Food Service Contracts due May 15, 2005
Centers that are contracting with a vendor or caterer for meals for fiscal year 2006 (July 1, 2005 – June 30, 2006) must submit food service contracts to Nutrition Services by May 15, 2005. Contracts with schools are due August 15, 2005. Contract packages are being mailed the week of March 21. Download forms and instructions here.

Child enrollment forms must contain additional information
Beginning April 1, 2005, child enrollment forms must contain information about children’s usual days and hours in care and usual meals eaten while in care. Read more and get a sample enrollment form
posted: 03/08/2005

Commodity declaration memo mailed
The Nebraska Department of Education Nutrition Services has mailed a memo to child and adult care centers regarding the choice of commodity foods or cash-in-lieu of commodities for Fiscal Year 2006 (July 1, 2005 – June 30, 2006). If you want to keep the same option as this year, do nothing. If you want to change to the other option, return form NDE 01-028 to NDE by April 18, 2005. This form was included in the mailing.
posted: 03/04/2005

What’s the cost of an error on income eligibility forms? – minor mistakes can add up to costly errors
posted: 03/01/2005

Voluntary Recall: Similac® Advance® with iron powder 12.9-oz. can lot number 20307RB
02/02/2005 NEWS RELEASE
Note: These products were distributed in Iowa, Kansas and Missouri

Change in cheese product
The USDA Mountain Plains regional office has issued the following information memo to states in its region (Nebraska is included):
“It has come to our attention that the name on KRAFT® cheese spreads and cheese foods has changed to Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product.

Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product is not creditable for any food-based menu planning approach for the Child Nutrition Programs. “Cheese Product” has never been a creditable ingredient in the Child Nutrition Programs. Cheese spread and cheese foods are creditable as shown in the Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs.”
01/27/2005

Clarification of meal pattern for infants, 8 – 11 months
01/19/2005

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Food and Nutrition

Adult Care

Archived News

2005 2017-08-22T19:01:42+00:00

Household contacts policy

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Household contacts policy

CACFP regulations now require that every sponsor of more than one child care center participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program in Nebraska must include in its monitoring of centers a system for making household contacts. State agencies must establish a system for sponsoring organizations to use in making household contacts as part of their review and oversight of participating facilities. Such systems must specify the circumstances under which household contacts will be made, as well as the procedures for conducting household contacts.

Currently there are two reasons to contact households and secure information:

  • Block claiming: When you review the monthly meal counts from each site, you must look for block claiming. Block claiming is defined as any instance when the number of meals claimed for one or more meal types (breakfast, lunch, snack, or supper) is identical for 15 consecutive days within a claiming period.

  • When the number of children observed during an on-site meal visit does not correspond to the “typical” number claimed for that meal or the number of children observed does not match the daily time in/time out records.

Beginning April 1, 2005 Nutrition Services consultants will begin monitoring the household contact system for sponsors of child care centers. Sponsors of more than one site must implement the household contact system beginning with the review of the April meal counts for all sites and the required on-site reviews performed after April 1, 2005.

Sponsors of centers are required to perform an on-site review for each site three times per year, with no more than 6 months between two on-site reviews. Failure to perform and document such reviews is grounds for a declaration of serious deficiency.

Download the Nebraska system

Download sample survey letter and form – This letter could also be used as a basis for telephone contacts.

Household contacts policy 2017-08-22T19:09:31+00:00

Child enrollment forms require additional information

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Child enrollment forms require additional information

Federal Regulations governing the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) now require that all children whose meals are claimed for reimbursement must be enrolled in the CACFP annually. Enrollment in the CACFP now requires the following information:

  • child’s name

  • child’s date of birth

  • date enrolled

  • information on each child’s normal days and hours in care

  • the meals normally served to the child while in care

  • signature of parent or legal guardian

This information must be collected on ALL enrollment forms for children enrolled in your center on or after April 1, 2005. For children already enrolled before April 1, 2005, enrollment forms containing all of the above information must be on file no later than September 30, 2005.

You may use your current enrollment form and add the new requirements to it. You may use the sample form provided by Nutrition Services or adapt it to meet your needs. As long as all of the items listed above are on your form, it will meet the requirements of the Federal Regulations.

      click here for the sample enrollment form

Enrollment in the CACFP must be done annually – enrollment forms will be considered good for one year from the date signed by the parent or legal guardian. Meals may be claimed only for eligible enrolled participants – failure to have enrollment forms on file for any children for whom meals are claimed may result in an overclaim.

The requirement for annual enrollment does not apply to centers that are classified on the CACFP as Outside-School-Hours Centers or to children participating only in the at-risk/area-eligible snack programs.

Child enrollment forms require additional information 2017-08-22T19:08:36+00:00

Calcium: Is is just for growing kids?

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Calcium – is it just for growing kids?

Remember when you were a child and your mom said, “Drink your milk and you’ll grow up strong?” As usual, Mom was right. However, many parents forgot to tell us to continue drinking milk after we finished growing. Our bodies’ need for the nutrient calcium, which is found in milk, never stops growing.

Since calcium cannot be made in our bodies, we must make sure we eat enough calcium-rich foods every day. If we don’t provide enough, our body pulls the calcium it needs from the calcium stored in our bones. Calcium helps our muscles contract and relax, our hearts to beat and our nerves to send messages. Too much calcium taken from our bones and not enough calcium replaced from the foods we eat could result in very weak and brittle bones, difficulty in chewing due to bone loss in the jaw, or possibly, a stroke or heart attack brought on by high blood pressure.

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for individuals over age 25 is 800 mg calcium per day. Dairy foods provide the best source of calcium. One cup of 1% milk provides 300 mg calcium. Two ounces of mozzarella cheese provide 366 mg calcium and 1/2 cup of soft serve ice milk provides 137 mg. These three foods, if eaten in one day, would provide 807 mg calcium RDA. Some choices of meats, fruits, vegetables and grains also provide some calcium. Canned salmon and sardines with bones, spinach, turnip greens, broccoli and homemade waffles contain varying amounts of calcium. Foods such as orange juice, bread, cereal and yogurt may have calcium added to them. Look for the words “calcium-fortified” on food labels. Although calcium supplements are also available, it is better to get calcium from foods rather than from pills. Contact your doctor before taking a calcium supplement.

To add more calcium to your diet:

  • Use milk, instead of water, when you prepare creamed soups, hot cereal or cocoa.

  • Add a slice of cheese to sandwiches or grated cheese to tossed salads or baked potatoes.

  • Drink milk with your meals.

  • Try different fruit flavors of yogurt.

  • Enjoy calcium-rich desserts such as puddings made with milk, custards, ice milk or frozen yogurt.

Calcium: Is is just for growing kids? 2017-08-22T19:08:34+00:00

Drink enough fluids

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Drink enough fluids

The sense of thirst declines with age, so older people may not drink enough water and other fluids. Sometimes people intentionally drink less to avoid going to the bathroom so often. But if you aren’t getting enough fluids you can become dehydrated, especially during hot weather.

Drinking plenty of fluids is important to help your body flush out wastes. Most adults should drink at least eight glasses of water a day.

Plain water, unsweetened fruit juices and low fat milk are good beverage choices. For a refreshing carbonated drink, mix fruit juice with club soda or seltzer water. To make plain water more appealing, try it chilled, with a twist of lemon or lime.

Drink enough fluids 2017-08-22T19:09:25+00:00

Disability awareness may be more important than you think

Child Caring Online - information about the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Disability awareness may be more than you think

If you work with disabled adults or children have you thought about the seemingly “normal” situations that we give them to deal with? Often, we may not be aware that simple things such as the height of the table can make it impossible to wheel up close enough to the table to enjoy a meal. Or even serving condiments in hard-to-open packages can be frustrating tasks for someone who suffers from a stroke or Alzheimer’s disease.

The following is a list of ideas for an employee training to help people become more aware of disabilities and difficulties in doing some routine activities. Set up activity stations. Have two people at each station and allow each person about 10 minutes to do the activities. When completed, you may all want to discuss what you experienced.

STATION 1 – VISUALLY IMPAIRED

1. Put on glasses which have been smeared with vaseline.

2. Take a lined index card from a covered container and a pencil. On the lined side of the index card, write your name on the top line, skip two lines and write your phone number, and then four lines from the bottom write your address.

3. Open a package of crackers, spread it with peanut butter and eat it.

4. Repeat steps one through three with your partner.

STATION 2 – DEXTERITY IMPAIRED

1. Put on a pair of gloves which are one size larger than you would normally wear.

2. Pick up a zipper plastic bag and open it, remove one napkin.

3. Pick up coins.

4. Open an individual package of jelly, ketchup or crackers.

5. Repeat steps one through four with your partner.

STATION 3 – WHEELCHAIR BOUND

1. Sit in the wheelchair

2. Push yourself around the room and through an open door.

3. Push yourself up to the table and pour a glass of water.

4. Repeat steps one through three with your partner.

STATION 4 – LIMITED USE OF ARM OR HAND

1. Tie a triangular bandage around the dominant arm to restrict the use of that arm and hand.

2. Open a bag and remove a napkin.

3. Place a raw potato on the cutting board and make a one-half inch slice.

4. With a spoon, feed yourself some canned applesauce that has been dished on a plate.

Adapted from: Hospital Food Service Management , March 1994.

Disability awareness may be more important than you think 2017-08-22T19:09:25+00:00
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