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Statistics

Statistics

The following statistics provide information about Nebraska's Career Education students. All information was collected through the Nebraska Student and Staff Record System (NSSRS) using data reported for the 2010-2011 school year. The objective in analyzing this data is to find out just who the Nebraska Career Education student really is and how he/she differs from the average Nebraska student.

CTE Students

In the 2010-2011 Nebraska school year, 63 percent of Nebraska students in grades 7-12 were identified as CTE Participants (taking at least one CTE semester-course during the 2010-2011 academic year). In the same year, 34 percent of Nebraska high school seniors were identified as CTE Concentrators (taking at least three CTE semester-courses throughout their academic career within a particular Career Education program of study).

CTE Students

CTE Students by Grade

About 58 percent of Nebraska junior high students (7-8th grades) were classified as Career Education Participants. About 65.5 percent of Nebraska high school students (9th-12th grades) were classified as Career Education Participants. This accounts for an average seven and one half percent increase in Career Education participant rates between junior high (7-8th grades) and high school. In addition, slightly more than one third of all Nebraska high school seniors were identified as Career Education Concentrators.

CTE Students by Grade

Gender

52 percent of Nebraska high school seniors were male students compared to 57 percent of male students who were Nebraska Career Education Concentrators (a five percent increase). 48 percent of Nebraska high school seniors were female students compared to 43 percent of female students who were Nebraska Career Education Concentrators (a five percent decrease). Overall, in the 2010-2011 school year, Career Education concentrators tended to be slightly more male and slightly less female than the Nebraska 12th grade population generally.

Gender

Ethnicity

Two percent of Nebraska high school seniors are identified as American Indian or Alaska Native students compared to approximately one percent of Nebraska Career Education Concentrators. Asian students account for one percent of CTE Concentrators and two percent of all high school seniors. Five percent of Black (not Hispanic) students were Career Education Concentrators whereas six percent of all high school seniors were black. Students of Hispanic ethnicity make up ten percent of Career Education Concentrators compared to thirteen percent of Nebraska high school seniors. Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students represent less than one percent of Nebraska high school seniors, as well as less than one percent of Career Education Concentrators. White (not Hispanic) students account for 75 percent of all high school seniors whereas 80 percent are CTE Concentrators. Based on ethnicity, Nebraska Career Education students very closely reflect the Nebraska high school 12th grade population as a whole.

Ethnicity

Immigration Status

3.8 percent of all high school seniors were immigrant students compared to 3 percent of Nebraska high school Concentrators for the 2010-2011 school year. There is a very slight deviation between these two groups of students, just eight tenths of one percent.

Immigration

Food Program Eligibility

The distinction between Food Program Eligibility (free or reduced lunch or free or reduced milk) is 32 percent for all high school seniors in Nebraska and 29 percent for CTE Concentrators. This is a three percent difference in eligibility for Food programs.

Food Program Eligibility

Gifted Eligibility

17 percent of both high school seniors were eligible for gifted programs as well as 17 percent of Career Education Concentrators.

Gifted Eligibility

AP or Honors Courses

Of the CTE Concentrators in our state, 33 percent take AP or Honors courses whereas 26 percent of all high school seniors take those similar advanced courses. There is about a seven percentage point difference in these two populations of students - one of the largest distinctions identified between the average Nebraska senior and the Nebraska Career Education Concentrator. Put another way, the odds of a student being eligible for AP or Honors courses are 1.6 times greater for CTE concentrators than non-concentrators.

AP or Honors

Dropouts

Dropout percentages for students in grades 7-12 during the 2010-2011 school year were as follows: Participants (students taking one or more CTE semester-course during an academic year) = 0.4 percent, Non-Participants = 2.9 percent, and overall = 1.3 percent of all Nebraska students in grades 7-12 (Participants and non-Participants) were identified as having dropped out. This is a 2.5 percentage point deviation in dropouts between CTE Participants and non-Participants. Put another way, the odds of being classified as a dropout are 7.4 times greater for students not participating in CTE than CTE Participants.

Dropouts

Completer with Diploma

82 percent of Nebraska high school seniors as a whole completed an approved program of study and met district/system requirements for a high school diploma compared to 99 percent of Career Education Concentrators. There is a 17 percentage point difference between those two populations. Put another way, the odds of completing high school with a diploma are 25.6 times greater for CTE Concentrators than students not concentrating in CTE. This percentage represents the largest deviation we have found between Career Education students and the average Nebraska high school senior when examining the 2010-2011 NSSRS data.

Completer with Diploma

PowerPoints

PowerPoint Icon

K-ACTE 2012 Summer Conference - Using CTE Data Beyond Accountability

Nebraska Career Education: A Dropout Prevention Strategy
2012 Administrators' Days

NACTEI 2012 - Using CTE Data Beyond Accountability

Just Who is the Nebraska Career Education Student?:
2010-2011 Descriptive Statistics (pdf)

Just Who is the Nebraska Career Education Student?:
2009-2010 Descriptive Statistics (pdf)

2011 NASDCTEc Fall Meeting Presentation

Padlocked

Locked in the CAR: Data Diversification in Career Technical Education

PadUnlocked

Unlocking the CAR: Data Diversification Strategies in Career Technical Education